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RARE LETTER SIGNED BY ALL THE BEATLES COULD FETCH £12,000 AT SALE

By Posted on 0 6

An “extremely rare” letter signed by all four members of The Beatles is set to fetch up to £12,000 at auction.
The typed letter to Atlanta DJ Paul Drew, who travelled with the band, was signed by John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr in September 1965.
It reads: “Dear Paul, we just thought that we would like to write to you all and say thanks very much for your help on the tour. We enjoyed it and appreciated your patience and co-operation. Hope to see you next year.”
John, Paul and Ringo all signed with their first names only, while George signed with his first and last name.

The letter, on NEMS Enterprises headed paper, is accompanied with a letter from press officer Tony Barrow, confirming details for the group’s 1965 tour. NEMS Enterprises was Beatles manager Brian Epstein’s company.
Both will be sold at Henry Aldridge and Son auctioneers in Devizes, Wiltshire, on Saturday.
Auctioneer Andrew Aldridge described the letter as an “extremely rare” piece of rock and roll history.
“Anything signed by all four Beatles is highly collectable but to have it on NEMS stationary and addressed to Paul Drew, one of architects of Top 40 radio takes it to another level,” he said.
The letters are expected to fetch between £8,000 and £12,000.

source:dailymail

CELEBRATE GEORGE´S 75th BIRTHDAY AT THE BEATLES STORY

By Posted on 0 12

Photo Credit: Paul Saltzman

To celebrate what would’ve been George’s 75th birthday, The Beatles Story, Albert Dock is hosting a free event dedicated to telling the story of George’s introduction to Indian music and spirituality on Sunday 25th February 2018 from 4pm. The event will include a talk, given by Dr. Mike Jones of the University of Liverpool’s Music Department exploring the Indian influence on the Beatles from its origins, through to the Rishikesh episode and beyond.
He will be joined by Thomas McConnell, a Liverpool-based singer songwriter, who will provide musical demonstration throughout the session. Tom is signed to Deltasonic Records and is currently touring his new album with his band, TV ME. He played at the Philharmonic Hall in June last year as part of the concert George Harrison: The Beatles and Indian Music. The event is free and will be held in the Fab4 café.
The Beatles Story has recently launched an exciting new special exhibition, ‘Beatles in India’, which features memorabilia, imagery and exclusive personal accounts from the people who were with the band in Rishikesh. The team at The Beatles Story encourage you to enjoy the exhibition before the talk, to get a real feel for George’s time spent in India. From ‘Something’ to ‘Here Comes The Sun’ and ‘All Things Must Pass’, singer, songwriter and guitarist George brought a deep sense of calm to music with beautiful melodies and heartfelt lyrics that have spanned the decades since his meteoric rise to fame.

Source:TheGuideLiverpool

EVENT CELEBRATING THE LIFE OF GEORGE AT PORTMEIRION IN NORTH WALES

By Posted on 0 12

George in 1993 filming interviews at Portmeirion Hotel which were used in the The Beatles Anthology

An event celebrating the life of George is being held at Portmeirion in North Wales.
The Italian Renaissance-style village was the distinctive setting for the ‘60s television series The Prisoner and was also a favourite spot for The Beatles with George holding his 50th birthday party there in 1993.
This event is open to the public and includes a tour of Portmeirion giving details of George’s links to the site.
There will also be a Q&A session with Freda Kelly , the band’s former PA and president of the official fan club.
Her role, which she undertook from 1962 to 1972 and saw her responding to fans’ letters, often staying up until 4am to do so. She also oversaw publication of a monthly fan club magazine.
The evening will finish with a performance from the singer Paul Jones who was cast as George in the The Cavern Club Beatles, and other special guests.

source:LiverpoolEcho

AUTHOR TO RECOUNT BEATLES’ VISITS TO CLEVELAND, SHARE RARE FOOTAGE

By Posted on 0 10

Alliance Beatles fans are invited to reminisce about the legendary band’s visits to Cleveland during a visit by author Dave Schwensen to Rodman public Library.

Schwensen, author of “The Beatles in Cleveland,” will share insider stories, rare concert films and never-before-published photos and memorabilia during the talk, which is set for 6:30 p.m. Monday in the library’s auditorium.
The program’s highlights will include films of the concerts at Cleveland Public Auditorium in 1964 and Municipal Stadium in 1966. During the Sept. 15, 1964, concert, police stopped the show in mid-performance and ordered the band off the stage.

source:cantonrep

 

 


THE BEATLES HELPED BRING EASTERN RELIGION TO THE WEST

By Posted on 0 14

On a February morning in 1967, George’s wife, Pattie Boyd, sat at her kitchen table and lamented to a girlfriend how she longed for something spiritual in her life. With that, the legendary party girl ripped a tiny newspaper advertisement for Transcendental Meditation classes out of the paper and, in that instant, began a ripple that would affect generations of young people across the world. A year later, the Beatles would go to India. Out of that trip came not just the band’s epic White Album and Donovan’s “Hurdy-Gurdy Man,” but a seismic shift in the popular understanding of Eastern spirituality, meditation and music. It also was the beginning of a strange relationship between the Beatles and the meditation movement that they inadvertently popularized. Not to mention the rise of an Indian guru who shaped my own life.

In August 1967, Boyd talked her husband into joining her at the Hilton Hotel in London to see Maharishi speak. She had learned his trademarked Transcendental Meditation that spring and had fallen in love with her daily mantra-based practice. In the end, all the Beatles joined them. Maharishi cut an enticing anti-establishment figure at a moment when the Beatles were questioning their reality – the then-47-year-old Indian man had long hair that flowed mane-like into his greying beard. He wore only a simple white robe and flip-flops. As he lectured at colleges and universities around the United States and Europe, young people became enamored with his simple notion of using meditation to elevate your consciousness. He would answer even the angstiest questions on the meaning of life or world events with an infectious giggle and the reassurance that life was simple and blissful. Maharishi supposedly didn’t know who the Beatles were when he met them, but he knew they were very famous – he was nothing if not media savvy (as described in Kurt Vonnegut’s essay, “Yes, We Have No Nirvanas”) – so he invited them all to a ten-day summer conference in Bangor, a small coastal city in Wales. It was there that the four men became devotees. The plan emerged to spend a few months in early 1968 at Maharishi’s ashram in Rishikesh. They all felt – to different degrees – a hunger to transform themselves. Maharishi was adamantly opposed to drugs and drinking and, Boyd wrote in her memoir, they were all on steady diet of weed and acid, stumbling daily through a mind-boggling hysterical swarm of paparazzi and fans.

But the hard living was in the rearview mirror when the Beatles flew to India in February of 1968, with a phalanx of reporters in tow. They went to Rishikesh, a small town at the foothills of the Himalayas. The plan was to stay for a few months – it was a course to make them teachers of Transcendental Meditation, although it didn’t seem anyone in the Beatles crew actually wanted to teach, they just wanted that time with Maharishi.

Life there was idyllic and simple, by most accounts – the Beatles slept in sparsely furnished rooms, and were awakened by peacocks. They meditated for much of the day, and listened to Maharishi lecture about reincarnation and consciousness. There were about 60 people at the ashram, including Donovan and his manager; the Beach Boys’ Mike Love; and Mia Farrow, with her brother Johnny and sister Prudence.

How and why they left their guru is the stuff of differing legends, and I’ve heard a dozen versions of what happened. I would say that the truth lies in the music that came out of that time – somewhere between “Sexy Sadie” and “Across the Universe” – part transcendent cosmic consciousness and part total betrayal and loss of faith. Whatever actually occurred, they decamped after two months in a bit of a huff, leaving Maharishi and his meditation movement behind. But Maharishi already had the photographic evidence and journalistic accounts of the Beatles’ devotion. The band moved on, but Maharishi’s star continued to rise, and TM became increasingly entrenched in popular culture. Life magazine proclaimed 1968 “The Year of the Guru,” and featured Maharishi on the cover with groovy, hallucinogenic spirals framing his face.

By the mid-1970s, the Movement estimated that it had 600,000 practitioners, with celebrities such as actress Shirley MacLaine and football star Joe Namath continuing to promote Maharishi’s techniques and vision. TM how-to books were a staple on the best-seller list, and at the time, the Movement estimated that an average of 40,000 people a month were learning the meditation practice. He bought two Heidelberg presses and began printing elaborate pamphlets and books and mission statements. He sent them out to world leaders and set up hundreds of certified centers throughout the United States, Europe and India. Later the media would describe TM as “the McDonald’s of the meditation business.”

Growing up in Fairfield in the 1980s and 1990s, the Beatles were an awkward part of our founding history. At the Maharishi School of the Age of Enlightenment –John, Paul, George and Ringo were sort of like estranged uncles whose stories were left to the shadows. There were celebrities who practiced meditation and who sometimes visited our school, smiling warmly as they watched us meditate or embark on our “consciousness-based education.” But while I have strange memories of Mike Love singing in our tiny school library, no Beatle ever came to visit. While the Beatles went through their own unraveling, tragedy and emergence as solo artists, the Transcendental Meditation community was winding itself into a tighter internal facing realm, entirely devoted to Maharishi and his global plans. At the time, TM became a forgotten byproduct of the hippie era.The binary tumult of that moment with the Beatles seemed to shadow Maharishi until his death. People treated him either like a god or a pariah. Popular narratives seemed stuck on this idea of a guru-disciple relationship, where Maharishi was either an enlightened sage who would transform your consciousness or as a media-savy opportunist who was after everyone’s money. There didn’t seem to be a middle option.

However, in the 2000s as Maharishi grew older and less present, something unlikely happened. TM returned to popular culture, thanks to the evangelical efforts of David Lynch, a longtime meditator who in 2002 attended something called the Enlightenment Course with Maharishi in Europe. After that, Lynch traveled around the country, talking to large groups about a simple technique that could make you happier, calmer, and more productive. Suddenly Rupert Murdoch and Katy Perry were tweeting about how much they loved it, but there was little to no mention of the guru. In 2009, Paul and Ringo performed for the David Lynch foundation, raising money to help children learn TM, along with Mike Love and Donovan. Onstage, they reminisced about the time and the music they made and said they loved meditation. All it seemed had been forgotten or forgiven, and together they sang “Cosmically Conscious.” Maharishi was not mentioned.

source:rollingstone