Sign up with your email address to be the first to know about new products, VIP offers, blog features & more.

You are viewing BRIAN EPSTEIN

PAUL: “I COULD HAVE DIED AT BEATLES GIGS”

By Posted on 0 8

Paul has revealed how some of his worst gigs were in his early Beatle days… and that he often risked life and limb playing with the band. Speaking to Radio X’s Gordon Smart, the former Beatle recalled that the legendary Liverpool venue The Cavern was a risky place to play.

He explained: “The early days tend to be the worst… In the Cavern, the condensation from the sweat from people would get into the amps.“We didn’t get electrocuted, we never even knew about that! You just used to lick your finger and hit the mike quick! And if you didn’t get a belt, you’d probably be alright.”


But Paul – who has just released a brand new double A-side called I Don’t Know and Come On To Me to celebrate his 76th birthday – admitted that his most embarrassing moment at a gig came in 2010.

He revealed: “We played the Apollo in New York, the great, great Apollo and we were so chuffed because it’s like a sacred place to us.“We were doing a tribute, a song called Hitch Hike, which is a Marvin Gaye song. It’s going great – all these famous people in the audience – there’s Keith Richards, there’s Howard Stern, there’s Tony Bennett… Chris Rock…t here’s like millions of people there and suddenly there’s this almighty noise!”

Paul explained that the show was interrupted by a horrible noise from the PA. “The guy on the monitors was panicking,” he went on. “At this great gig that we really wanted to go well, there’s this unholy noise so I had to cover. And I was just chatting to the audience ‘hey, good to see Tony Bennett’s here, come on up here Tony – you can sing!’”


Paul has just announced the release of his 17th solo album in the shape of Egypt Station, which is to be released on 7 September. It’s his first new album since 2013’s NEW and has been produced (apart from one track) by Greg Kurstin who has done the business for Foo Fighters and Liam Gallagher.

source:radiox.co.uk

HAPPY BIRTHDAY PAUL !

By Posted on 0 3


RINGO & HIS ALL STARR BAND AT VENUE STADTPARK IN HAMBURG

By Posted on 0 No tags 13

Ringo at Venue Stadtpark in Hamburg

SETLIST

Matchbox
It Don’t Come Easy
Dreadlock Holiday
Evil Ways
Rosanna
Down Under
Boys
Don’t Pass Me By
Yellow Submarine
I’m Not in Love
Black Magic Woman/Gypsy Queen
You’re Sixteen
Who Can It Be Now?
The Things We Do for Love
Oye como va
IWanna Be Your Man
Hold the Line
Photograph
Act Naturally
With a Little Help From My Friends/Give Peace a Chance

Klaus Voormann came on stage to sing the Beatles classic “With a little help from my friends” with Ringo Starr and his All Starr Band

 

 

 

 

Backstage: With Klaus Voormann

Ringo and Klaus in front of the Kaiserkeller Hamburg.


PAUL MCCARTNEY OUTSIDE 20 FORTHLIN ROAD

By Posted on 0 No tags 4



RINGO & HIS ALL STARR BAND – BORGATA ATLANTIC CITY – VIDEOS (6/1/18)

By Posted on 0 22


BEATLES BOOKS GUIDE

By Posted on 0 , 10

The best books about the Beatles rank among the best pop culture writing—and criticism—ever. The following volumes provide the foundation of any Beatles library. These titles offer richly reported history, incisive critical analysis, detailed accounts of the quartet at work, and insider accounts that humanize a band who are still often seen as larger-than-life caricatures. Reading any one of these books will provide insight into a phenomenon that’s often thought of only in the broadest terms.

 

The Complete Beatles Recording Sessions: The Official Story of the Abbey Road Years by Mark Lewisohn

Granted unprecedented access to Abbey Road’s vaults and tape logs, Mark Lewisohn wrote The Complete Beatles Recording Sessions as a sequel to The Beatles Live!, a chronicle of all the concerts the Fabs played. That 1986 book splits the difference between fan service and scholarship, but The Complete Beatles Recording Sessions transcends such distinctions by providing a riveting day-by-day account of how the Beatles created their art. Alternate takes are examined in detail, along with overdubs and unreleased songs, many of which wouldn’t make it out of the Abbey Road vaults until the ’90s release of the multi-part Anthology, if ever. Lewisohn’s skills as a documentarian give this book an enthralling narrative: The songs take shape in print as he precisely details them.

ORDER YOUR COPY HERE:

USA: H E R E .

UK: H E R E .

 

As Time Goes By by Derek Taylor

Derek Taylor was one of the great non-musical figures of ’60s rock’n’roll. He served as the Beatles press agent twice, once during Beatlemania and once after the 1967 death of the band’s manager, Brian Epstein—before returning to helm the press office of Apple Corps, the doomed multimedia conglomerate the band established in 1968. He also spent the middle of the Swinging Sixties in California, where he worked with the Byrds, organized the Monterey Pop Festival, and was unsuccessfully wooed by Hollywood icon Mae West. Taylor attracted these luminaries because he was there during the heat of Beatlemania, but the wondrous thing about his memoir, As Time Goes By, is how he’s as much an observer as he is a participant in the chaos. Already in his 30s when he discovered the Beatles, Taylor’s life was transformed by the Fabs. The book was written in 1973, when the group were all alive and all thorns in his side, but he was keen to capture just how wondrous their moment in time was.

ORDER YOUR COPY HERE:

USA: H E R E.

UK: H E R E .

 

Dreaming the Beatles: The Love Story of One Band and the Whole World by Rob Sheffield (2017)

Nearly every book about the Beatles is a historical document of some sort, attempting to capture the group within the confines of the ’60s. Rob Sheffield turns this concept on its head with Dreaming the Beatles, choosing instead to interpret what they meant as an evolving cultural institution in the decades following their breakup.
This isn’t to say Sheffield dismisses history. As a music critic who grew up with the Beatles as a constant in his life, he’s absorbed countless books and articles about the band, which frees him to draw fresh, surprising insights about their music, including the stacks of records the Fab Four released as solo artists.
Dreaming the Beatles is the only book to acknowledge the interconnectivity (the music he made as a Beatle/solo) and it’s also filled with sharp criticism that challenges conventional wisdom. Once you know the history by heart, this is the place to understand what the Beatles mean now.

ORDER YOUR COPY HERE:

USA : H E R E .

UK (PAPERBACK): H E R E .

UK (HARDCOVER): H E R E.

 

Tune In: The Beatles: All These Years, Volume 1 by Mark Lewisohn

Tune In—the first (and, to date, only) installment in a planned three-part biography from eminent Beatles scholar Mark Lewisohn, he intentionally recreates the rise of the Beatles at a pace so unhurried, it gives the illusion that events are unfolding in real time. Perhaps such deliberateness is the inexorable result of a lifetime spent researching the Beatles, but the remarkable achievement of Tune In is how it makes the group’s first act, which runs from before the band’s formation until the end of 1962, seem like their most exciting era.

All of this is due to to Lewisohn’s decision to start his research from scratch. In doing so, he finds that printing the legend has obscured the truth: Such worn stories like Decca Records refusing to sign the Beatles, how George Martin received his assignment to produce the group, and John choosing which parent to live with simply didn’t happen the way scores of books say they did. These revelations, combined with Lewisohn’s knack at illustrating how the Beatles’ rise was not inevitable—time and time again, they hit limits on their respective circuits, and Lennon and McCartney went years without writing originals—gives Tune In a corrective punch. If Lewisohn never completes the other two volumes, at least he set the record straight for what is perhaps the murkiest period of the Beatles.

USA: H E R E.

UK: H E R E.

source:pitchfork