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PATTIE BOYD SAYS GEORGE WAS TRUE LOVE, DESPITE AFFAIR WITH ERIC CLAPTON

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Pattie Boyd has spoken of what it was like to be at the heart of music’s most toxic love triangle.
The woman who opitmised the swinging sixities has spoken about a new documentary film about Clapton, which reveals details of her relationships with the two rock rivals.
She was 21 when she married George but fellow guitarist Eric Clapton fell in love with his friend’s wife and pusued her relentlessly.

In an interview with The Times,Pattie, now 73 and married to her third husband Rod Weston, is asked who was the love of her life. She replied: “I think George. He was always very loving.” “Even after we split he was always my friend. We’d still speak on the phone.“And he came to see me before he died. If you love somebody you do that. And I think he always loved me.” She is less flattering about Erid though, saying: “Eric loves himself. I don’t think there’s much room for me.”

Describing her dilema she said: “Eric was pursuing me and I was so indecisive about leaving George. Then Eric sank into this mess of taking heroin. He vowed he would if I rejected him. “It was only after that that we got together and maybe it was four years too late.”

Both men were inspired to write songs about her. George wrote “Something” and Clapton wrote “Layla.”
The documentary film is called Eric Clapton: Life in 12 Bars and Pattie describes it as “a brutally honest portrayal of someone in pain.”
She says: “I think he’s brave to have done it. It showed me so many of Eric’s problems stemmed from his childhood and how unberably cruel his mother was.”

source:mirror.uk

CELEBRATE THE LIFE AND MUSIC OF GEORGE HARRISON, WITH A SPECIAL REISSUE OF CONCERT FOR GEORGE

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CELEBRATE THE LIFE AND MUSIC OF GEORGE HARRISON, WITH A SPECIAL REISSUE OF CONCERT FOR GEORGE

AVAILABLE FOR THE FIRST TIME ON VINYL – AS A 180 GRAM 4-LP BOX SET, AND A LIMITED-EDITION DELUXE BOX SET

SET FOR RELEASE ON FEBRUARY 23, 2018
February 25th marks what would have been George Harrison’s 75th birthday. In loving remembrance, CONCERT FOR GEORGE, will be reissued for the first time on vinyl, available as a 4-LP Box Set, as well as a Limited Edition Deluxe 10-disc Box Set via Concord Music.

The Deluxe Box Set (limited to 1,000 pieces worldwide), features the complete sound and film recordings from the concert (on 4 180 gram audiophile LPs, 2 CDs and 2 Blu-rays), a 12″x12″ hard-bound 60-page book, plus an opportunity to own a piece of this historic event, by way of a cutting from the original hand-painted on-stage tapestry used as the backdrop at the Royal Albert Hall on November 29, 2002. The package is housed in a gold-colored, fabric-wrapped box with a die-cut mandala window to display the unique stage fabric (which is mounted on an individually numbered card, suitable for framing).

PRE-ORDER HERE

The 4-LP Box Set includes the complete sound recordings from CONCERT FOR GEORGE, on 180 gram audiophile vinyl, featuring a special, mandala-design etched on side-8. This is the first time that all songs from the performance have been available on an audio configuration. The album will also be made newly available via streaming platforms, track listing mirroring that of the 4-LP box set.

PRE-ORDER HERE

In addition to the new vinyl formats, the release will also be available as a 2-CD set, as well as 2-CD + 2-DVD and 2-CD + 2-Blu-ray combo packages.

The 2-CD set features sound recordings from the concert, including performances from Eric Clapton, Jeff Lynne, Paul McCartney, Tom Petty, Monty Python, Ravi & Anoushka Shankar, Ringo Starr and more. The DVD and Blu-ray sets also include the complete filmed concert on the first disc, with a second disc containing the original theatrical version featuring concert highlights, interviews with the performers, rehearsals and behind-the-scenes footage. Exclusive to the Blu-ray format, the second disc includes an interview segment featuring Ringo Starr, Jim Keltner and Ray Cooper entitled “Drummers”.

 


ON THIS DAY: “WONDERWALL MUSIC” SESSIONS BEGAN

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“Wonderwall Music” sessions began on this day in Bombay (Mumbai) to record the soundtrack for the film.
The musicians included Ashish Khan (sarod), ahapurush Misra (tabla and pakavaj), Sharad Jadev and Hanuman Jadev (shanhais), Shambu-Das, Indril Bhattacharya and Shankar Ghosh (sitar), Chandra Shakher (sur-bahar), Shiv Kumar Sharmar (santorr), SR Kenkare and Hari Prasad Chaurasia (flute), Vinayak Vohra (taar shehnai) and Rijram Desad (dholak, harmonium and tabla-tarang).

The Bombay sessions took place at EMI Recording Studios, based at the Universal Insurance Building, Sir Pherozeshah Mehta Rd, Fort, Bombay 400001.

 
 

HAPPY NEW YEAR FROM JOHN, PAUL, GEORGE & RINGO!

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RAVI SHANKAR’s FAMILY GIFTED ONE OF HIS FOUR SITARS MADE IN 1961 TO THE BRITISH MUSEUM IN LONDON

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Sitar Maestro Pandit Ravi Shankar’s family recently gifted one of his four sitars made in 1961 to the British Museum in London. The gifted sitar was specially designed for the maestro by Kolkata-based instrument maker Nodu Mullick. The sitar has been placed in room 33 of the renovated Sir Joseph Hotung Gallery of China and South Asia and has been displayed as one of its most valuable possessions from South Asia. The Sitar was gifted to the British Museum by Shankar’s widow Sukanya Shankar, his daughter Anoushka Shankar along with the Ravi Shankar Foundation that is based in New Delhi. The sitar gifted to the museum is considered “particularly special” by Richard Blurton who is the head of the museum’s South and Southeast Asia section.

Blurton on Wednesday while talking about the sitar said that it was the first one to be made by Nodu Mullick for the sitar maestro. He added that other examples of Indian musical instruments exist in the museum’s collection, though none are as beautifully decorated or so connected to a cultural figure of the stature of Pandit Ravi Shankar.

Shankar who passed away in the year 2012 at the age of 92 had performed in the United Kingdom several times and was best known in the country for his collaboration with The Beatles member George Harrison. His elder brother Uday Shankar was a well-known dancer who studied and performed in London. Uday is known to have visited the British Museum to study Indian medieval sculpture as part of his efforts to develop his new Indian dance. Blurton while talking about the connection of the museum to Shankar’s family said that the wonderful gift of the sitar is just the latest chapter in the history of connections between the Shankar family and the museum.

He added that the gift of the sitar to the Museum enables the telling of the human side of the story of Ravi Shankar’s life and work, both in the west and in India, but also to place him, and other cultural ambassadors, within the context of the discovery of the cultural achievements of the entire world.


REMEMBERING GEORGE 16 YEARS LATER

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It has been 16 years since we woke up to the sad news that George had passed.

According to the Beatles producer George Martin, George Harrison was “the Beatles’ Third Man, always there yet somehow elusive”. As well as being the “quiet Beatle”, he was the rock guitarist who introduced the sitar to British pop music, a stalwart devotee of transcendental meditation, a film producer and an underrated songwriter – his composition Something was recorded by dozens of singers and was the only Beatles song featured in concert by Frank Sinatra.

His contribution was considerable. He designed guitar breaks and riffs to suit the range of song genres used by John and Paul, although he had less opportunity than he would have liked to cut loose.

He also got to sing at least one number on each album, beginning with Do You Want To Know A Secret? on the debut album. But probably his most important influence on the group concerned the new sound textures he introduced. Chief among these was the sitar. George was intrigued and he contrived a meeting with the sitar virtuoso Ravi Shankar at the home of the leader of the Asian Music Circle in London. He briefly studied with Shankar, to be able to use the sitar in Beatle music. Eventually, too, the Beatles agreed to record his compositions, of which Within You Without You (from Sgt Pepper- True genius) While My Guitar Gently Weeps (from the White Album) and Here Comes The Sun and Something (from Abbey Road) were among the most memorable.

He held many strong opinions-on Beatlemania, on global want, on his right to privacy, on his God-and gave firm voice to most of them. But George Harrison was certainly the most reluctant Beatle, wanting out almost as soon as he was in. He often said that his luckiest break was joining the band and his second luckiest was leaving it. The standard line is that George was transparent: a terrific guitarist, a fine songwriter, a wonderer, a seeker and, overriding all, a celebrity who hated and feared celebrity.

George died in Los Angeles 16 years ago, losing his last battle with cancer. He was beloved, and had been for a long time. He had thrived in the aftermath of the band’s breakup, becoming a recording artist on the level of his former mates Paul and John.

He is sorely missed and was greatly loved all over this planet. He came to stand for something very large, and beautiful. George, we love and miss you.