Sign up with your email address to be the first to know about new products, VIP offers, blog features & more.

You are viewing PAUL MCCARTNEY

PAUL: ‘I CAN’T BELIEVE I WAS ONE OF THE BEATLES’

By Posted on 0 11
EVEN the most successful songwriter in history has memory lapses from time to time.
“I do sometimes think, ‘Wait a minute! I was one of The Beatles! Can you believe that?’” Sir Paul McCartney tells Stellar with a laugh.
“I was one half of the Lennon/McCartney songwriting team!
“Occasionally these things occur to me. Normally it’s just something I take for granted, but sometimes I look at it and think, ‘Bloody hell, it’s amazing.’ Then I get right off it before my head explodes.”
The figures are enough to warrant cranial expansion: 800 million albums sold by The Beatles alone; 30 American No. 1 singles; 2200 cover versions of ‘Yesterday’; 21 Grammy awards; and a fortune estimated to be more than $1 billion.
Yet McCartney remains the music world’s most modest genius.
This year marks the 60th anniversary of a 15-year-old McCartney joining The Quarrymen, a band started by John Lennon. In 1960, they renamed themselves The Beatles and went on to change not just the way music was made — but literally change the world.
“You start off trying to achieve something,” McCartney tells Stellar in his only interview with an Australian publication.
“When John and I met I said, ‘One of my hobbies is writing songs, I’ve written a couple of songs.’ He was the only person I’d ever met who said, ‘Yeah? So have I.’ So when you think of those real humble beginnings, of the two of us showing each other the little songs we’d written, then starting to write together, it is amazing that we carried on and went from strength to strength.
“We wrote songs that people actually know and love and are really famous around the world. I do sometimes think, ‘Blimey.’ Obviously I’m really very proud of it. I can’t believe my luck. Not only did I get to do it for a living, I ended up being pretty good at it.”
This December, McCartney will bring those “pretty good” songs back to Australia for the first time in 24 years.
“Raising kids” is one reason he uses to explain the long absence from our shores.
“Now they’re pretty much all grown up, some with kids of their own,” he says.
“I’ve managed to find a window.”
Stretching over two and a half hours, his live show is an even mix of songs by The Beatles and his other band Wings, along with his solo material.
On most nights, he shoehorns in ‘A Hard Day’s Night’, ‘Blackbird’, ‘Jet’, ‘Love Me Do’, ‘We Can Work It Out’, ‘The Fool On The Hill’, ‘Let It Be’, ‘Live And Let Die’, ‘Eleanor Rigby’, ‘Something’, ‘I Saw Her Standing There’ and ‘Yesterday’.
Having to work out which stone-cold classics to leave out is a superstar’s first-world problem.
“I sit down before a tour and think, ‘If I was going to this show, what would I definitely want to hear?’” McCartney explains.
“So I write down the songs where the show wouldn’t be the same if ‘he’ didn’t play them. Then I start thinking, ‘Well, a lot of people might not know this one, but a lot of Wings fans will know this one.’ I try to put stuff in for people who want a little more depth. You’re trying to give people value for money.
“I remember very well when I paid my hard-earned money to go to a show and ended up feeling a bit cheated. Even when the economy is doing well, and now when it’s not doing well, people spend a lot of money on the tickets. I want them to go away and think, ‘You know what? That was worth it.’”
McCartney is currently making his 17th solo album — the first since 2013’s New, on which he worked with producers Mark Ronson (Amy Winehouse, Bruno Mars), Paul Epworth (Florence + the Machine) and Ethan Johns (Kings of Leon). For the new album, he is collaborating with Greg Kurstin, an American songwriter and producer who has worked with Pink, Beck, Kelly Clarkson and most notably Adele.
Yet even after all his achievements, McCartney is worried about the possible perception that he’s just grabbing “the man of the moment”.
He points out he worked with Kurstin two years ago after being told by mutual friends that he and the producer would get on.
“I was thinking that people who didn’t know I’d already worked with him might think, ‘Oh, he’s going with Adele’s producer, thinking he’ll turn him into Adele.’”
Does McCartney really worry about what a noisy minority might think?
“I don’t worry about it, but you’re conscious of it. There are some people I know who really don’t care what anyone thinks. I admire that. But most people I know aren’t like that.
“Even if it’s an ordinary job, you want to do it well, you want your work mates to think you’re cool, you want your boss to think you do a great job. It’s a common thing. So yeah, I’m like that. I’d prefer it if people like it.
“I probably have a bit of a hard time when people don’t like something I’ve spent a lot of time on. Making an album is sometimes like sitting an exam — learning everything and putting all the work in. And suddenly someone marks it. At that moment, most people hope they got it right. And that’s what it would be like for me: I’d put a record out and expect some bad criticism from some people, probably, but I kinda like it if people like what I’m doing.”
When you’ve released as many albums as McCartney has, there’s bound to be a milestone almost every year.
This year marks the 50th anniversary of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band — the 32 million-selling record many believe was the blueprint for concept albums.
Remixed by Giles Martin (son of late Beatles producer George Martin) and with never-before-heard studio outtakes, the album returned to No. 1 on the UK charts in June.
“It’s amazing,” Paul says.
“It’s a good thing to have it released as an anniversary thing, but for people to like it and send it to No. 1 was unbelievable.”
Like many albums McCartney has been involved with, Sgt. Pepper’s has been passed down from generation to generation — a video of school children singing ‘When I’m 64’ became a feel-good internet moment last month.
“There was a time when it was pretty much just [people] your age that came to the show,” he says.
“Those people then grew up as we did; they had kids like we did. You’d see their kids coming to shows. Now we’re at the age where their kids’ kids are coming. You get the parents, their kids and the grandkids.
“I love that. I love that they can all come to the same show and enjoy it for different reasons. The kids are coming, presumably, because they like the songs, the parents are coming because of the nostalgia and what it reminds them of … it’s really nice.
“You see a lot of humanistic scenarios in the audience — people crying, laughing, singing along. The fact that the music can bring a whole family together is pretty cool.”
McCartney’s whole family now stretches to five children and eight grandchildren.
Daughter Mary followed her late mother Linda into photography — she shot her father in his London home for today’s cover of Stellar.
“She knows how to make you look good,” McCartney says of the never-seen-before images.
“Of course, instead of it being just anyone, it’s my little Mary. Well, she was my little baby, now she’s a hard-working mum with four kids. She’s a really good photographer. She can boss me around: ‘Don’t do that, stop, stand up, gimme a smile.’ She’s my favourite photographer.”
Paul and Linda had four children: artist Heather, 54, photographer and cookery writer Mary, 47, fashion designer Stella, 45, and musician James, 39.
The singer’s six-year marriage to model and activist Heather Mills ended badly (it’s his only no-go area when being interviewed), but resulted in his youngest child, 13-year-old Beatrice.
McCartney wed New Yorker Nancy Shevell in 2011; they’ll celebrate 10 years since their first meeting by travelling together to Australia for his tour.
While McCartney tops every “wealthiest musician” list, Shevell, 57, is no slouch herself, maintaining a nine-figure family transport fortune.
“Nancy’s very impressive. She is a businesswoman, she still runs her dad’s trucking company with 4000 trucks,” McCartney says proudly.
“She’s a trucker. She’s used to men’s humour. She’s a beautiful, smart and funny girl. She loves music … We’re very happy together.”
Most of McCartney’s children have adopted the vegetarian diet and animal rights beliefs that Paul and Linda were celebrity pioneers of back in 1975.
“We were on a farm, it was lambing season, and we were eating lamb. It suddenly clicked, ‘Maybe we don’t want to eat this anymore?’” McCartney recalls.
“It’s a style of life that I like and it’s always done me good … and a bunch of animals good, too.”
Aside from music, vegetarianism is one of the McCartneys’ major legacies; a chain of meat-free food options still bears Linda’s name.
“Most people are animal lovers,” he says.
“When you go vegie you become more aware of animal cruelty. Linda was very cool with it; she’d talk in a way that didn’t put your back up and she’d persuade you that these animals should be saved. She had such a good way about her that people would accept it, rather than getting into a big argument.
“We were able to do a lot of animal rights work — you feel good about that. I live on a sheep farm and the sheep die of old age. That never happens — they never reach that age, but my old lot do. It’s a nice feeling.
“We share this beautiful planet with all these other creatures. My idea is, why not give them their shot? Then you get the environmental angle which is very important these days, particularly when you’ve got someone like Trump who thinks it’s a hoax.”
Last year, McCartney copped flak from his Republican-leaning US fans when he was photographed with Hillary Clinton. As someone who divides his time between the UK and US, he doesn’t mince words when asked about Donald Trump.
“I’m not a fan at all,” McCartney says.
“He’s unleashed a kind of violent prejudice that is sometimes latent among people. Most people don’t feel it’s OK to be like that. When there were protesters at his rallies, Trump would say, ‘Oh beat them up, give them a good punch’ — wait a minute, I’m not sure that’s cool for a leader of a country to be saying that. Maybe for a hockey player.
“He’s unleashed the ugly side of America. People feel like they have got a free pass to be, if not violent, at least antagonistic towards people of a different colour or a different race. I think we all thought we’d got past that a long time ago.”
At 75, Paul is two years younger than the other remaining Beatle, Ringo, and just over a year older than The Rolling Stones’ Mick Jagger and Keith Richards.
“When I was a kid I’d look at someone who was 75 and think, ‘Bloody hell, that’s old,’” he laughs.
“But you get to 40 and you think, ‘40, that’s old.’ Then you get to 50 and think, ‘Well, 40 wasn’t so old.’ As you go on you look at the decade before and think, ‘I thought I was old then, but I wasn’t.’ Now you look at people the decade ahead of you and think, ‘Well, he’s still pretty cool.’
“I enjoy very much what I do: I feel healthy, I’m having a good time, making a new record, going on tour. It’s my dream come true. It’s what I always wanted to do when I was a kid. I’m still allowed to do it, so I’m not complaining.
“I belong to the group who think age is just a number. As you get to my age you’re inevitably aware of your mortality and you start thinking, ‘What does that mean to my kids and my grandchildren?’ But I’ve always taken the same attitude: when my time is up, that’s it. Until then, I’m going to have a laugh.”
Paul McCartney’s Australian tour starts in Perth on December 2.


PAUL AND SONY SETTLE BEATLES COPYRIGHT SUIT

By Posted on 0 4

Paul and Sony have settled the lawsuit he filed back in January to reclaim the copyright to some of his earliest songs with the Beatles.
Paul and Sony/ATV Music Publishing have settled out of court. Details of the settlement are unknown.
“The parties have resolved this matter by entering into a confidential settlement agreement and jointly request that the Court enter the enclosed proposed order dismissing the above-referenced action without prejudice,” McCartney’s attorney, Michael Jacobs, told U.S. District Judge Edgardo Ramos.

Paul lost the rights to the Beatles catalog back in 1985, when Michael Jackson outbid him when they went up for sale. Jackson paid more than $47 million for ATV, the company that had owned copyrights to Beatles songs since 1967. A decade later, Jackson sold half of his share to Sony for $100 million. Following Jackson’s death in 2009, his estate sold the remaining shares to Sony for $750 million in 2016. McCartney has been wrangling to get them back since then.
According to the Copyright Act, songs written before 1978, like the entire Beatles catalog, revert back to the composers after 56 years. McCartney’s songs, written with John Lennon, would therefore start becoming available in 2018, and continue reverting annually through the anniversary of the Beatles’ dissolution in 2025.
While it looks like Paul will once again take ownership of his songs sometime next year, the order states that the New York federal court will “enforce the terms of the parties’ Settlement Agreement, should a dispute arise.”


‘YOU GAVE ME THE ANSWER’ – Tim Minchin Asks (Part 1)

By Posted on 0 10

It’s been another fun ‘One On One’ month here at PaulMcCartney.com with Paul announcing new dates in Colombia, Australia, New Zealand and Mexico!

In an exciting first for Paul, the ANZ dates (our office name for the Australia and New Zealand tour leg!) were announced during a Facebook Live Q&A session with Australia’s very own comedian / musician Tim Minchin.

We were lucky enough to watch the interview from a quiet corner at the back of the room, where we spent half an hour trying to stifle our laughter as Paul and Tim bounced off one another in a brilliant interview!

As the interview was only broadcast to Paul’s ANZ fans, we thought it would be a good idea to share some of our favourite questions and answers in a special two-part edition of ‘You Gave Me The Answer’ – Tim Minchin style!

Tim Minchin [TM]: So I’m gonna tell everyone the dates.
Paul McCartney [PM]: Great
TM: Paul’s starting in Perth on December 2nd, then Melbourne on the 5th, Brisbane on the 9th, Sydney on the 11th and Auckland on 16th of December. I’m incredibly excited by it, I’m gonna try and be down in Australia for them. And what we’re doing today is we’ve got people from the internet who have questions for you, Paul, and I hope they’re all questions that you’ve never heard before.
PM: Yeah, and I will try and answer them – I might refuse to answer a few!
TM: It would be good if we could have a quite awkward moment.
PM: I could get an awkward moment going.
TM: Maybe end up in a fight? That would certainly get on the news.
PM: That will get some attention.
TM: And this is what you need, you need more attention because you just can’t sell tickets otherwise. We need something to go viral!

TM: “What are your fondest memories of Australia? And will we get a chance to hear ‘Ode to a Koala Bear’ being slipped into the set?”
PM: That’s a thought, isn’t it? Yeah, I hadn’t thought about that. Fondest memories I think – wild life! Because we don’t have that over here, we don’t have kangaroos, or koalas. We went to a zoo and me and the kids were able to hold a little peaceful koala.
TM: Yeah, some of them are evil.
PM: This one didn’t attack anyone! Seeing kangaroos hopping by the roadside as we were driving along was fairly surreal for me.
TM: I grew up with that happening all the time, but I must admit it must be pretty weird, if you’ve never seen it before.
PM: Or else it was frogs, hopping.
TM: Yeah, well the first time I saw a frog, I freaked out.

TM:  Okay, this is one of those ‘what’s your favourite’ questions – which are always impossible – but Josh Coote from New Zealand asks: “What is your favourite album that you’ve had a part in recording?”
PM: Yeah, like you say it really is a difficult question because they change, you know, your favourites. And also they’re like your children – you don’t want to have a favourite! This year it’s got to be Sgt. Pepper. I’m re-listening to it because it’s been re-released after fifty years! And it does sound good! But I do like Rubber Soul and I do like Band on the Run.
TM: Me too. I find – like everyone does – your career just impossible to get my head around and how you guys survived that and came out being so normal and stuff. But I can’t imagine how you separate those albums in the ‘60s. You were writing songs at such an incredible rate. Do you sometimes misplace experiences? Or is it very clear what the Sgt. Pepper experience was like, or what the Rubber Soul experience was like?
PM: Yeah. You know, it does merge into one a little bit! The Beatles’ recording career, it’s all pretty much Abbey Road. So you know, my main memory of recording is Studio 2, Abbey Road. But I’ve got a pretty good recollection of certainly Sgt. Pepper, because that was the first time we’d been really allowed as much time as we wanted. Because we were now “off the road” and so that was different. We could fuss over every little sound. And you know, I’d kind of forgotten that we did until some of the films and stuff came out about Sgt. Pepper. Where a guy, he does a thing about ‘Penny Lane’. He says, “and here’s ‘Penny Lane’ and here’s the piano”, and he says, “it’s not just one piano, it’s eight pianos”, and I’m going, “What?!”
TM: George, you scallywag
PM: No, Paul and you Beatles, you scallywags ‘cause I’d just forgotten we did that. But we had so much time it was like, “Okay, the piano sounds good, but let’s do another piano, with a bit more trebly – ting ting ting – and bring out that bit. And then let’s put a little harmonium and fold that into the piano sound.”
TM: So you’re building that. ‘Cause the reason I said George is because I assumed that you sorta put down eight versions and then he afterwards…
PM: No, George did a lot of stuff afterwards. But it was mainly us. Mainly us just on a big creative surge, who suddenly had time, you know. So we’d be like, “Ah, let’s do this”. And the chord at the end of ‘A Day In The Life’ – this is one of The Beatles songs for younger viewers – famous chord at the end of it…
TM: I know it very very well.
PM: I just came in and said, “Have you ever put the loud pedal down on the piano and hit a chord and just see how long it lasts for?” I was fascinated. It goes for a good minute, “You can still hear it”, kind of thing. So we did that idea, but then George Martin would say, “Okay, it’s running out”. So he fed in another piano. So George would do expert things like that, which was very cool.
TM: I was obsessed by trying to end a musical I just was involved with writing with a chord that sounded that good. I don’t think we quite made it, but it’s a similar sense of just home – we’re home and we’re not going anywhere. Unbelievable.

TM: “Hey Paul” says Robert House, also from Australia, “just wondering how much the Liverpool sense of humour played a part in the success of The Beatles”. Which I guess is a question you’ve had a million times, but since Ron’s documentary, it’s so present.
PM: No not really. Yeah, you don’t actually get asked. You normally get asked more about music, you know. But I do think it was a big thing. ‘Cause, you know, being from Liverpool, you’re sort of naturally surrounded by a big sense of humour, everyone’s always joshing and doing things, my Dad would say the craziest things. So when the four of us got together we all kind of knew that was our background. And then ‘cause we spent so much time together the sense of humour really helped. And so in songs and things, the sense of humour kind of crept in. I mean we had a song, we were really fighting with, which was one of mine, which was ‘Golden Rings’, and it was terrible. It was like “oh baby I’ll get you golden rings”, and it was like “God” (yawns). We couldn’t, me and John were sitting down and we couldn’t finish it. And then we decided to change it into ‘Drive My Car’, where there’s a girl who hasn’t actually got a car, but she wants a chauffeur. So the sense of humour kind of creeps in, in those kind of places. And then just to stop you going mad, is the other reason for a good sense of humour.
TM: Well, that was the incredible thing about the recent documentary, is, how much that was clear, was that your humour and your comradery was absolute survival. And when being funny stopped working, that’s when you stopped. Like really, when it all got so serious that you couldn’t survive with banter anymore, you could no longer look at the press and be cheeky. That was the beginning of the end of the touring era. That’s certiainly how I-
PM: I think that’s right, yeah. That’s true
TM: Amazing that you got out at that point, instead of letting that – ‘cause then, subsequently there was still all that wit in the lyrics. I mean I’m obsessed by wit in lyrics and it’s why I – part of the many reasons why you guys are so important to me is that you were witty all the time, there was all this stuff going on – anyway this is just gonna turn into one of those – anyway, anyway-
PM: All down to Liverpool. I went back to Liverpool years ago – I’m always going back up and I have a school there which I went to called the Liverpool Institute. Me and George went there, so I tell people “half The Beatles went to this school”, you know – good reason to save it. Anyway it was falling down so we did save it and it’s now a performing arts school. And I was going back up there, feeling very good about myself, you know. And I looked over and I see an old Liverpool guy. He goes “Hey, Paul”, and I go “Yes”, thinking, yes – he goes (swears with two fingers to his face) – “Thank you!” you know.
TM: I’m home.

TM: Wow, I mean there’s so many questions. I haven’t even read this one: “One thing I really admire about you as an artist”, says Ciaran Shalley from New Zealand. “Is your never-ending endeavour to continuously experiment with new sounds and types of music and how you’re always open to collaborating with younger artists like Michael Jackson in the ‘80s and more recently Kanye West and Rihanna. What other modern artists do you like?” It’s me, it’s me, clearly.
PM: Besides, Tim?
TM: Yeah. “And have any helped you? Have any helped influence sounds for some material on your new album?” Do you think you get influence back from them? Do you listen lots?
PM: I’m not sure about that. You know, I definitely like working with other people and so like in Kanye’s case, I just got a phone call and my manager said, “Kanye West would like to work with you”. So I go,“Yeah”. And we do it. I was a little bit nervous at first ‘cause I thought, “Oh God, it could go horribly wrong”. But I was intrigued to see what he was up to and how he did it really. And it was a very intriguing process. You basically don’t write songs. You basically just talk and noodle a bit and you just record it all on your phone. And then he goes away and (whistles) and that’s basically his record! But it was great doing it though because I don’t work like that, I normally sit down with a guitar. So I think it kind of does influence you a bit. It opens doors. As I say, you know, I would just talk to him about something and it would give him an idea for a song and when we finished – we wrote for about two or three days – just in the afternoons and didn’t tell anyone ‘cause I said, “You know, if this doesn’t work, let’s just pretend we didn’t – you know, we never got around to it and don’t tell anyone”. So I was waiting, you know three months after we’d finished. I didn’t really hear anything except,  “Hey bro, what’s going – yeah”. But I’m thinking, should I say, “Did we write a song? Is there a record to come out of this?” You know? Anyway this arrives, and it’s a Rihanna song, I’m going, “This is great”. It’s ‘FourFiveSeconds’, and I’m going, “This is great!” But I have to ring up and say, “Am I on this?” And he goes, “Oh yeah, you’re the guitar player”. I go, “I don’t remember…” and he says, “yeah, we sped it up”. So they manipulate this, kind of…
TM: It’s a totally different creative process, isn’t it?
PM: Yeah. Although, you know, we were talking about Sgt. Pepper, we loved manipulating. So I think we would have been into a lot of these tricks nowadays. Because you know, we did speed things up a little bit, probably not as much – well we couldn’t have actually sped it up as much as Kanye was allowed to – (makes squealing noise) – it would have been very Mickey Mouse. In fact, you do get a bit of that on the Rihanna record. There is a little bit that goes, “How ‘bout a mystery”. And apparently that’s me, sped up.
TM: It is amazing, and I have no doubt that you… I mean, you guys were pushing the form forward absolutely at an incredible rate. And pushing production technology forward at an incredible rate. It blows my mind to think… I guess people like Kanye perhaps are the equivalent these days. But I’m the same when I think about writing a song. I sit down at a piano and write a song and that’s just… no one that I know at twenty is doing that really. It’s all about loops and…
PM: And it’s a strange thing because I get involved with that. You know, sometimes I’ll try a producer I’ve never worked with before but I like what he does. So I say, “Well, you know – here goes nothing!” I’ll just ring him up and we’ll get together. And again I’m going in the studio with songs, wondering if I’m gonna be asked to use them. And it’s like, “Well, no.” (Mimes drumming) “Here’s a groove”. I go, “Well, that’s good”. And now the producer will say, “Now go out and sing”. I’ll go, “Uh, what?” He’ll say, “Well just, you know… feel it!”
TM: I find that so scary
PM: It’s improv. Well, I actually… halfway through these sessions – I’ve just recently done it. It worked out. But halfway through I said, “This is like panic for me”. ‘Cause I’m standing there. I don’t know how the tune goes, I don’t know what the words are. And I’m just going, “Yeah! Woah! I really love you, baby! Woah! I gotta get it on!” And these are the worst bloody lyrics ever!
TM: Because your starting lyrics are always bad. That’s the point of songwriting is that you start with crap and you hone it into something good. And you go, “What? We’re gonna leave out the honing bit and just do the intuitive bit?” I don’t know, but…
PM: I ended up saying, “Okay, we’ll do it like this. But then you’ve gotta go away and I’ve gotta write this song”. You know, we’ll do all the blocking (sings). Then I’ll go (sings) and put words in. But it was fascinating doing it.
TM: I bet. I find it weird.

Make sure to check back next month for part two of ‘You Gave Me The Answer – Tim Minchin Asks…’


PAUL ENJOYS CASUAL TRAIN RIDE WITHOUT BODYGUARDS IN FIRST CLASS

By Posted on 0 8

Paul proved to be just like everyone else as he enjoyed a casual train ride.
He was spotted cutting a solo figure as he boarded a train at Kings Cross to Hastings and made himself comfortable in a seat in first class.

Paul looked relaxed as he kept himself engaged in some reading material during the train journey and proved not to have entourage or his bodyguard in sight.

According to on-lookers, as well as reading the paper, the Ticket To Ride hitmaker passed his time by also ‘looking at his old school Nokia.’
He also proved to very pleasant when approached by admirers, with one stating: ‘He was on his own without any bodyguards or staff.
‘Only a few people stopped to say hello and that it was nice to see him,’ the city-worker revealed, before continuing: ‘He didn’t want photos but he was very polite and happy to chat, taking about a new album he has coming out.
‘It was unusual seeing such a massive music star just sat on his own.’

 

 

source:DailyMail


GWINNETT OFFICIALS USE ROAD NAME TO HELP LURE PAUL TO THE INFINITE ENERGY CENTER

By Posted on 0 8

It’s no Abbey Road or Penny Lane, but the new street leading to the Infinite Energy Center shows how excited local officials are for Paul McCartney’s upcoming visit to the county — and how much they wanted to get him here.

The folks at Explore Gwinnett and the Infinite Energy Center want to make the most of their chance to get the former Beatle to visit as part of his One On One tour, so they offered to name a street for him as part of their bid to get on the tour, according to the center’s Executive Director of Sales, Book and Event Management, Dan Markham. The music legend had the final say on the road name, but a proclamation issued by county commissioners on Tuesday revealed his pick: Paul McCartney Boulevard. “It was actually one of the things that we did in the marketing, as far as luring him in, because it’s a smaller venue than he typically plays, so we kind of enhanced it,” Markham said. “We kind of got the idea because the road was getting ready to go in, and we told him we’d actually name a road after him, and he thought that was absolutely fantastic. “We gave him some suggestions, Abbey Road, Penny Lane, that kind of stuff and then he picked it. He said, ‘If you’re putting a road in, I want Paul McCartney Boulevard,’ so he got the final word.”

The naming of the road is being done ahead of McCartney’s July 13 concert at the Infinite Energy Arena. Infinite Energy Center officials said the not-so-long, but definitely winding road that is being named for McCartney is a new one that snakes its way down to the center property from Meadow Church Road. Signage with the new road’s name has already been posted at the street’s intersection with Meadow Church.“It was a little unique,” Markham said. “In each case (with a concert booking), we’ve got to be a little clever because we’ve got so much competition in town.”

This is the first time the center has hosted McCartney, who is often referred to simply as “Macca” by diehard fans. He has won 18 Grammy’s, been knighted by Queen Elizabeth II and received France’s Legion of Honour. He is coming to Gwinnett County as part of his One On One Tour, which opened in April.

Tickets to his concert at the center went on sale May 1, and officials said it was one of the fastest selling shows in the center’s history.

“The tickets were actually spoken for literally as it went up for sale,” Markham said. “It is a great honor for the county and Infinite Energy Center to have such a renowned performer visit,” the center’s General Manager, Joey Dennis, said in a statement. “The community is excited to show Paul true southern hospitality.”McCartney’s links to street names don’t end with those last two song titles, or the road at the Infinite Energy Center though. The Beatle infamous street crossing cover photo for the Abbey Road album fueled rumors that he had died and was replaced with a look-a-like, in part, because he was only member of the band who was barefoot in the picture.

In the proclamation issued on Tuesday, county commissioners highlighted McCartney’s career, but they also said naming the street in his honor symbolizes the center’s ability to get a performer of his caliber. “I will tell you as a kid in school in Dacula, I could never have imagined having world class talent coming to perform in Gwinnett county,” Commission Chairwoman Charlotte Nash said. “This was a very different place at that point in time. “I want to say thanks to the hard work of the folks at the convention and visitor’s bureau, to the folks that have worked so hard with the center and ave sold that as the great venue that it is and have turned it into a place where performers from all aspects of entertainment are excited about coming and performing there.”

While a Paul McCartney Boulevard sign might sound tempting for sticky fingered Beatles fans who might want to steal it for their personal collection of memorabilia, Explore Gwinnett Executive Director Lisa Anders said the tourism group and the center are hopeful that it doesn’t happen.

She had a simple suggestions for fans who might be tempted: “Selfies, not stealing,” referring to the fact that she said fans can take selfies in front of the sign if they want to. “We hope that people respect the property that’s there, and maybe take a selfie with it,” Anders said. “We’ll encourage selfie taking, but not ‘borrowing.’ We have a backup plan (if the sign is stolen), but we don’t anticipate that happening. We have faith in our citizens.” And, while Markham said McCartney is aware that the road was named in his honor, he won’t see it for the first time until he arrives for the concert. “They’re going to route his limo and bring him in that way exclusively because he’s going to want to see it,” Markham said.

PAUL GETS ‘ONE ON ONE’ WITH MEXICO

By Posted on 0 10

PAUL McCARTNEY
Gets ‘ONE ON ONE’ with Mexico City
New 2017 concert announced

28th October: Estadio Azteca, Mexico City

Speaking about his forthcoming visit Paul said:

“Mexico holds so many special memories for me. We’ve had some brilliant nights there and I’m looking forward to making more great memories on this tour. We are going to have a huge party together. Getting ready to rock Mexico!”  

PAULMcCARTNEY.COM PRE-SALE INFO:

Fans registered with PaulMcCartney.com will be eligible to purchase pre-sale tickets through PaulMcCartney.com at 10am (local / 4pm BST) on Friday 30th June. To purchase your tickets on Friday, click the link below and enter the following access code: PAUL1ON1MEXICO

28th October: Estadio Azteca, Mexico City – CLICK HERE FOR TICKETS!

Register to be eligible for PaulMcCartney.com pre-sales by clicking HERE!

Paul’s new ‘One On One’ Tour launched in the US in 2016 and saw him play 41 shows across 12 different countries to over 1.2 million people, winning rave reviews from both concert-goers and the media. The final run of shows in 2016 concluded with Paul’s headlining performance at the now legendary Desert Trip festival in the US. Last week saw Paul play his first shows of 2017 in Japan as well as announcing new North American dates for this summer.  Paul played four huge sell out shows in Tokyo winning rave reviews.

This show marks Paul’s first visit to Mexico in five years. His last trip saw him play a historic massive outdoor show in Zocalo Square as part of his record breaking ‘On The Run’ world tour, pulling in more than 250,000 attendees! Since his first visit in 1993 Paul has played ten concerts in Mexico.