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THE BEATLES’ BREAK-UP PAPERS TO BE ACTIONED AT CHRISTIE’S

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McCartney’s official affidavit – featuring annotations by Lennon – expected to fetch over $100,000

The official affidavit filed in 1970 by Paul McCartney to initiate the break-up of The Beatles is to be auctioned at Christie’s next week (June 14).
The legal document, which features annotations by John Lennon countering McCartney’s claims, is expected to fetch $100,000 to $150,000.
On the affidavit, filed on New Year’s Eve 1970, McCartney lists 25 reasons why he is seeking official dissolution of The Beatles’ partnership. Many of those points are countered by Lennon in handwritten annotations.
One of the key reasons cited by McCartney is the band’s decision to cease touring: “Whilst we had been touring the relationship between us was very close.” To this Lennon counters: “many fights on tour about leadership.”

As for their studio tussles, McCartney alleges that: “Lennon was no longer interested “in the performance of songs which he had not written himself.” Lennon responds: “Paul was guilty of this for years”.
Next to the point where McCartney complains about Apple seeking to delay the release of his solo album McCartney, Lennon writes that the band “resented the high handed way in which his record ‘suddenly’ appeared, and demanding release dates with no consideration whatever for other Apple Products.”

VINTAGE ROCK 2018 : THE BEATLES – THE LATER YEARS

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YELLOW SUBMARINE 7″ PICTURE DISC COMMEMORATES 50th ANNIVERSARY

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Yellow Submarine 7″ Picture Disc Commemorates 50th Anniversary

This July marks the 50th anniversary of our animated classic film, Yellow Submarine.

On its release in 1968, Yellow Submarine was instantly recognised as a landmark achievement. The film combined pioneering animation techniques, dazzling visual invention, witty dialogue and of course glorious music.

As part of the celebrations, we are releasing this picture disc of the title song, Yellow Submarine b/w Eleanor Rigby, which together was originally released as the band’s 13th single in August 1966.

USA: ORDER YOUR COPY HERE

UK: ORDER YOUR COPY HERE

The limited edition 7” features images taken from the high resolution 4K restoration of the film.

The film is returning to the big screen from July 8th
Come join us 80,000 leagues under the sea, to a place where peace, love and music reign supreme!


THE REAL SGT.PEPPER FROM THE BEATLES ALBUM COVER

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Long story short, the 20th Century’s most widely-known British non-commissioned officer was real. Only his name wasn’t Pepper, it was Babington. And he was a Lieutenant General.

Paul McCartney chose the image of Gen. Sir James Melville Babington as the real-life visage of the fictional Sgt. Pepper for the Beatles 1967 album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. For most people, being on a Beatles album would be the highlight of their life. Not so for one of the British Empire’s decorated officers.
The Scottish-born Babington came up in the ranks of the British Imperial military through the Boer War of the 19th century, spending decades fighting insurgencies against the Dutch descended residents of the southern tip of Africa. He scored a number of decisive wins there, becoming a feared opponent of the rebels. He left just before the end of the war, which went just about as well as you think it might when a bunch of farmers take on the largest empire on earth.
After laying the smack down on the Boers in South Africa, he did a brief stint in England before being transferred to take command of the New Zealand Defence Force in 1902. After five years, he was sent back to London, where he stayed until World War I broke out
From there, he took command of the British 23rd Division under the New Army. Described as “elderly but fearless” he spent a lot of effort and Crown funds on outfitting his men, unlike many other commanders. As a result, his men loved him and fought so hard at legendary WWI battles like the Somme and Ypres. He also led men along the fronts that aren’t as talked about in history books, like Italy and the Asiago Plateau.
When he retired, he was Lieutenant General Sir James Melville Babington KCB, KCMG, commander of British Forces in Italy. He died in 1936, and would never know that his face finally achieved worldwide fame, probably even in South Africa.
source:wearethemighty

TOM MURRAY’S ACCLAIMED BEATLES PHOTO COLLECTION, ‘THE MAD DAY 1968’ RETURNS TO NEW YORK

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New York City gallery Soho Contemporary Art is welcoming back The Beatles, The Mad Day: Summer Of ’68 Collection, by award-winning photographer Tom Murray. The much-acclaimed exhibition originally debuted in New York and Murray’s full collection is again on public display from today, Thursday, 31 May, with a private VIP reception to celebrate its 50th year. The exhibit will then be open to the public starting on 1 June and it runs through to 16 June.

The photographs in the much-acclaimed collection date from 28 July 1968. On that day, British photographer Murray captured numerous images of The Fab Four. The shoot was done on the run (literally) all over London in order to escape the hordes of screaming Beatles fans that followed them everywhere.

Rushing from location to location inspired the name of the famous collection: The Mad Day: Summer of ’68. These images would become the last publicity shoot of all four Beatles together- and represent the quintessential Beatles at the height of their psychedelic period and are considered the most important color photographs of the group. The Beatles officially disbanded in 1970.

“Tom is a great photographer and our Gallery is thrilled to welcome him back to the family”, said Irene and Rick Rounick, founders and owners of Soho Contemporary Art. The Gallery is located on the lower East Side of Manhattan at 259 Bowery.

Tom Murray Mad Day Out Beatles Photos

Photograph by Tom Murray / Courtesy Soho Contemporary Art

The exhibit also includes a bronze sculpture rendering of Murray’s photograph ‘Coming Apart’ that captures McCartney almost falling off the roof of a building with the rest of the Fab Four hanging on, created by noted British sculptor Andrew Edwards.

The sculpture, which is a foot and a half in height, is just the first piece of a larger 8-foot piece that Edwards plans on creating. The bronze sculpture will make its public debut during the exhibit’s opening reception.

Edwards’ previously made bronze sculptures of The Beatles were unveiled on the docks in Liverpool in 2016 and are one of the most commonly photographed sculptures in the UK.

The Mad Day Collection has showed internationally in museums and galleries in cities such as New York City, Los Angeles, Paris, Sweden and London where the opening ceremony of a permanent collection at the Museum in Docklands was officiated by the Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, and Stockholm where the collection was presented in honor of the Queen of Sweden. The Museum of Radio and Television in Los Angeles also has a selection of the photographs in its permanent collection.

Tom Murray Mad Day Out Beatles Photos Gallery

Photograph by Tom Murray / Courtesy Soho Contemporary Art

Tom Murray is an award-winning photographer whose work spans portraiture, theater, fashion, advertising, newspapers and magazines. He perfected his craft working for newspapers, becoming the head of photography for The Sunday Times Colour Magazine, London’s first Sunday magazine. He then worked alongside master photographers Helmut Newton and Lord Snowdon.

Tom Murray’s The Beatles Collection, The Mad Day: Summer of ’68 is now at Soho Contemporary Art from 31 May through 16 June.

ORDER “MAD DAY OUT” By  TOM MURRAY… H E R E :

USA : H E R E .

UK : H E R E .

source:udiscovermusic



JOHN LENNON FILMING ‘HOW I WON THE WAR’

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In the fall of 1966, Look magazine’s European editor Leonard Gross and photographer Douglas Kirkland visited John Lennon on-location during the filming of ‘How I Won The War.’ The article, entitled ‘John Lennon: A Shorn Beatle Tries It On His Own’, would be published in Look ,1966

Whoever would have dreamed that beneath that mop lurked a Renaissance man? Yet there, shorn, sits John Lennon, champion minstrel, literary Beatle, coarse truthsayer, who turned Christendom on with one wildly misunderstood gibe at cant. Now, face white, tunic red, playing wounded in a field of weeds, this pop-rock De Vinci is proposing to act for real. Relaxed to all appearances, he is all knots inside. “I was just a bundle of nerves the first day. I couldn’t hardly speak I was so nervous. My first speech was in a forest, on patrol. I was suppose to say, ‘My heart’s not in it any more’ and it wasn’t. I went home and said to myself, ‘Either you’re not going to be like that, or you’re going to give up.’”
As he casts his weak brown eyes at the camera, the entire movie company jockeys for a glimpse. “I don’t mind talking to the camera — it’s people that throw me.”
Sure enough, he blows his lines. He waggles his head in shame. “Sorry about that.” But under the low-key coaxing of Director Dick Lester, Beatle John becomes Private Gripweed, a complex British orderly, in a film, How I Won The War.

Lennon at 26, said: “I feel I want to be them all– painter, writer, actor, singer, player, musician. I want to try them all, and I’m lucky enough to be able to. I want to see which one turns me on. This is for me, this film, because apart from wanting to do it because of what it stands for, I want to see what I’ll be like when I’ve done it.” “I don’t want people taking things from me that aren’t really me. They make you something that they want to make you, that isn’t really you. They come and talk to find answers, but they’re their answers, not us. We’re not Beatles to each other, you know. It’s a joke to us. If we’re going out the door of the hotel, we say, ‘Right! Beatle John! Beatle George now! Come on, let’s go!’ We don’t put on a false front or anything. But we just know that leaving the door, we turn into Beatles because everybody looking at us sees the Beatles. We’re not the Beatles at all. We’re just us.” “But we made it, and we asked for it to an extent, and that’s how it’s going to be. That’s why George is in India (studying the sitar,) and I’m here. Because we’re a bit tired of going out the door, and the only way to soften the blow is just to spread it a bit.”

In that kind of mood, a Dick Lester set was just the therapy for Lennon. Each man is the kind who makes the New Theologians jump. To them, the individual is more thrill than threat — a unique being who should be taken for what he is. Lester, who directed both Beatle films, gratefully recalls his first meeting with the group, when the movies were just an idea. “They allowed me to be what I damn well pleased. I didn’t have to put on an act for them, and they didn’t put one on for me.” This is what a Lester set is like: Once more, they are in a deserted German square, now, with all the paraphernalia of movie-making, with British ‘soldiers,’ Lennon among them, ready to comb the streets, with German ‘soldiers’ lying in wait. “Quiet please!” an assistant shouts — just as a little boy walks into the scene. Apoplectic, the assistant rushes forward and shoves the child aside. Lester, whose normal weapon is humor, flushes. “Don’t push!” he commands.

Lennon’s lack of pretense astonished the actors. “He’s someone who just tries anything,” one of them marveled. “No stand-in, no special treatment, no chair for him.” During a break for tea one raw morning, Lennon queued with the rest. When his turn arrived, his heart’s desire was gone. “You don’t have to be a star to get a cheese sandwich,” he mused. “You just have to be first.” They like his humor too. That same morning, a German mother pushed her three-year-old son up to the Beatle, clutching his autograph book in his hand. “Sign it!” she demanded. Lennon did as bidden, telling the boy, “Yes, sir, you put us where we are today.” On location in Spain one afternoon, the script required Lennon to drive a troop carrier along the beach. Accelerating too fast, he spun the wheels; the rear of the carrier sank. As his crestfallen director approached the cab, Lennon peered sheepishly over his glasses and gave him a limp salute.

“The class thing is just as snobby as it ever was. People like us can break through a little — but only a little. Once, we went into this restaurant and nearly got thrown out for looking like we looked until they saw who it was. ‘What do you want? What do you want?’ the headwaiter said, ‘We’ve come to bloody eat, that’s what we want,’ we said. The owner spotted us and said, ‘Ah, a table sir, over here, sir.’ It just took me back to when I was 19, and I couldn’t get anywhere without being stared at or remarked about. It’s only since I’ve been a Beatle that people have said, ‘Oh, wonderful, come in, come in,’ and I’ve forgotten a bit about what they’re really thinking. They see the shining star, but when there’s no glow about you, they only see the clothes and the haircut again.”

“I’m not a cynic. They’re getting my character out of some of things I write or say. They can’t do that. I hate tags. I’m slightly cynical, but I’m not a cynic. One can be wry one day and cynical the next and ironic the next. I’m a cynic about most things that are taken for granted. I’m cynical about society, politics, newspapers, government. But I’m not cynical about life, love, goodness, death. That’s why I really don’t want to be labeled a cynic.”
It is in the context of the young man who recoils at distortion that his now-famous remark should be viewed.

source:videomuzic.eu