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GEORGE HARRISON AND RINGO’S HANDWRITTEN LYRICS WHILE MY GUITAR GENTLY WEEPS UP FOR AUCTION FOR $195K

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The handwritten lyrics to The Beatles classic song While My Guitar Gently Weeps, off their legendary self-titled double album, also known as The White Album, are up for auction through the memorabilia company Moments in Time for $195,000.

George Harrison and bandmate Ringo Starr both took turns writing the words to the tune out on the back of a studio recording sheet.
The duo were fleshing out the lyrics to one of Harrison’s most iconic songs while the band was recording at EMI’s Abbey Road Studios in London back in 1968.

‘I Look at You all see the love there that’s sleeping — While my guitar gently weeps,’ Harrison began at the top of the sheet.
He continued at the bottom with, ‘While my Guitar Gently weeps as I’m sitting here doing nothing but aging still my guitar G W.’

Starr scribbled all the lyrics in between, which included his effort to work out a misspelling of the side of the paper.
Hand-writing expert Frank Caizzo authenticated the lyric sheet.

‘It is complete with his misspellings, a Ringo trademark, and shows him working out one of the misspelled words on the side,’ Caizzo wrote in a letter of authenticity posted to the auction website momentsintime.com.

The lyric sheet represents a working draft used during the recording of The White Album, The Beatles’ ninth studio album.

It has since gone on to be regarded as the most diverse and eclectic group of songs the band released during their wildly successful career (1960-1970).

Beatle song lyrics, such as this artifact, are rarely put up for auction.

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ABBEY ROAD NAMED BEST-SELLING VINYL LP OF THE 2010s

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Nielsen Music’s report on U.S. music sales in the ’10s confirmed the BeatlesAbbey Road as the best-selling vinyl album of the decade.

Year-to-year album sales increased nearly 15 percent in 2019, up to 18.8 million sold. But new releases made up only 33 percent of total vinyl sales last year, with catalog LPs accounting for the rest.

The decade’s Top 10 is likewise dominated by older releases, including classic vinyl from Pink Floyd, Fleetwood Mac and Miles Davis. You can see the complete list, with sales figures, below.
The Beatles bested Floyd’s second-place finisher The Dark Side of the Moon by nearly 200,000 units. Only one original album from the ’10s appears in the decade-ending tally: Lana Del Rey’s Born to Die. The Guardians of the Galaxy soundtrack, though issued in 2014, is comprised of songs from the ’60s and ’70s.

Abbey Road returned as an expanded box-set reissue last year in commemoration of its 50th year. That helped the Beatles to the No. 1 spot in U.S. vinyl sales for 2019; Billie Eilish’s When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go? was runner up.

The Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper Lonely Hearts Club Band, which also saw a massive reissue in 2017, made the decade-ending Top 10, as well. Queen rode interest in the Bohemian Rhapsody biopic to two spots on the year-end sales list: Greatest Hits 1 finished third in 2019, and the film’s soundtrack ended up at No. 5.

Top 10 Best-Selling Vinyl Albums of the ’10s
1. The Beatles – Abbey Road (558,000)
2. Pink Floyd – Dark Side of the Moon (376,00)
3. Guardians of the Galaxy Awesome Mix Vol. 1 (367,000)
4. Bob Marley and the Wailers – Legend (364,000)
5. Amy Winehouse – Back to Black (351,000)
6. Michael Jackson – Thriller (334,000)
7. The Beatles – Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (313,000)
8. Fleetwood Mac – Rumours (304,000)
9. Miles Davis – Kind of Blue (286,000)
10. Lana Del Rey – Born to Die (283,000)

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THE MOMENT JOHN LENNON AND PAUL MCCARTNEY NEARLY REUNITED LIVE ON SNL

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On April 24, 1976, John Lennon and Paul McCartney nearly took Lorne Michaels up on his offer to have the Beatles perform on Saturday Night Live…

There are a lot of ‘almost’ moments in rock and roll history, one that has always hung heavily over our heads was the very real moment Saturday Night Live nearly reunited The Beatles, had John Lennon and Paul McCartney been bothered to get up from watching it on TV.

In the iconic first series of ‘Saturday Night Live’ – America’s home of alternative weekend hilarity – show’s legendary producer, Lorne Michaels set himself a fairly big challenge: to reunite The Beatles. He started as any SNL act would, with a piece direct to camera.

Whether Michaels was performing with the real intent of reuniting the most enigmatic songwriting partnership to have ever existed in Lennon and McCartney, or he was just doing a bit, he shared the sentiment of a nation. Michaels talks directly to the camera about how The Beatles had affected so many lives, “In my book, The Beatles are the best thing that ever happened to music. It goes even deeper than that — you’re not just a musical group, you’re a part of us. We grew up with you.”

He sincerely suggests an offer to the pair, “Now, we’ve heard and read a lot about personality and legal conflicts that might prevent you guys from reuniting. That’s something which is none of my business. That’s a personal problem. You guys will have to handle that. But it’s also been said that no one has yet to come up with enough money to satisfy you. Well, if it’s money you want, there’s no problem here.”

Audiences across the country gasp in hope that maybe this might just happen, with Network money anything is possible, surely? Michaels continued, The National Broadcasting Company has authorized me to offer you this check to be on our show. A certified cheque for $3,000.” It now becomes a little clearer that Michaels’ tongue was firmly in his cheek.

The producer continues with the bit and explains how all the band need to do is sing three songs “‘She Loves You,’ yeah, yeah, yeah – that’s $1,000 right there. You know the words. It’ll be easy. Like I said, this is made out to ‘The Beatles.’ You divide it any way you want. If you want to give Ringo [Starr] less, that’s up to you. I’d rather not get involved.”

Here it is, that ‘almost’ moment we promised. While Michaels entertained the audience in the studio with his skit the millions of folks watching at home were likely laughing away with them – John Lennon and Paul McCartney included. Unbeknown to Michaels and the rest of the globe, the duo was just a mile or so away watching the show together in John’s apartment in the Dakota building.

As Lennon said in 1980, “Paul … was visiting us at our place in the Dakota. We were watching it and almost went down to the studio, just as a gag. We nearly got into a cab, but we were actually too tired. … He and I were just sitting there watching the show, and we went, ‘Ha ha, wouldn’t it be funny if we went down? But we didn’t.”

Paul McCartney would confirm the story saying, “John said, ‘We should go down, just you and me. There’s only two of us so we’ll take half the money.’ And for a second. … But It would have been work, and we were having a night off, so we elected not to go. It was a nice idea – we nearly did it.”

Oh, what could have been. It’s an ‘almost’ moment so tantalising that a TV film was made about what would have happened had they of reunited in 1976. The film is called Two of Us and first aired on VH1 in 2000.

George Harrison would go on to be a musical guest on ‘Saturday Night Live’ later in the year and carry on the joke. Arriving to collect the previously offered cheque, he and Michaels discuss the split. With the producer’s hands tied Harrison agrees that for an extra $250 he would say the show’s iconic opening line, “Live from New York, it’s Saturday Night!”

Sadly the show would never be able to reunite The Beatles. Lennon and McCartney were just a mile and a half away from the studio and the world was just as close to a historical moment.

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THE CALIFORNIA BAND GEORGE HARRISON SAID INSPIRED ‘IF I NEEDED SOMEONE’

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In 1965, The Beatles started on a new path. After racking up No. 1 hits with songs like “She Loves You” , the Fab Four began digging deeper. John Lennon, resolving to turn the lens on himself, had his most introspective moment to that point with “Help.”

Though he charted a path in a different direction, Paul McCartney was also growing rapidly as a songwriter. After delivering the masterpiece “Yesterday,” he followed with more like “Drive My Car” and “You Won’t See” me on Rubber Soul (released later in ’65).

By then, John was turning out classics like the sitar-infused “Norwegian Wood”.
On the track “If I Needed Someone,” George incorporated two new influences: Indian music and the Los Angeles band, The Byrds.

When The Byrds’ cover of “Mr. Tambourine Man” hit No. 1 on the U.S. and UK charts in ’65, “folk rock” or the “California sound” became known by everyone on the music scene. A year earlier, the group had formed when L.A. musicians wanted to combine the depth of folk with the energy of The Beatles.

After watching A Hard Day’s Night, Roger McGuinn went out and bought the 12-string Rickenbacker guitar George played. On their first album (Mr. Tambourine Man, 1965), The Byrds played three more Bob Dylan covers along with a track by Pete Seeger called “The Bells of Rhymney.”

While The Byrds freely acknowledged the influence of The Beatles on their early sound, this track would go on to influence George’s “If I Needed Someone” on Rubber Soul. George made sure to let McGuinn and his bandmates know about it.

When Derek Taylor (a Beatles press officer) moved to California in ’65, he brought a recording of “If I Needed Someone” and a message from George for McGuinn. “[Taylor] said George wanted me to know that he had written the song based on [“The Bells of Rhymney”],” McGuinn said in 2004. “It was a great honor.”

In ’65, The Byrds went to London to play some shows and capitalize on the success of their top-10 UK hits. Even though the tour wasn’t an overwhelming success, at least McGuinn, David Crosby, and the rest of the band got to meet both The Beatles and the Rolling Stones.

It wasn’t only a musical exchange. After seeing McGuinn’s signature rectangular “granny” glasses, George got himself a pair, which you see him wearing in photos from that era. (McGuinn claimed John’s small round glasses were based on these, too.)

At one point during these years, The Beatles even called The Byrds their favorite new band. So there was a lot of mutual respect between the two. As McGuinn said in ’04, “It was kind of a cool cross-pollination in a way.”

For George, that period stood as a high point for him in The Beatles. He called Rubber Soul his favorite album. “The most important thing about it was that we were suddenly hearing sounds we weren’t able to hear before,” he said in the ’90s. “Everything was blossoming at that time — including us.”