Sign up with your email address to be the first to know about new products, VIP offers, blog features & more.

Tag Archives JOHN LENNON

“DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE” FEATURES A SAMPLE OF “MIND TRAIN” TRACK TAKEN FROM JOHN LENNON-PRODUCED ALBUM “FLY”

By Posted on 0 , 23

 

Death Cab For Cutie are back with a new single. “Gold Rush”, from the band’s new album ‘Thank You For Today’, samples a track from Ono’s 1971 album ‘Fly.’

“Gold Rush” is the first single from Thank You For Today, Death Cab For Cutie’s forthcoming ninth record, and second without founding member Chris Walla.

The album will be out August 17th on Warner Music. “Gold Rush” also features a sample of Yoko Ono’s “Mind Train,” a 17-minute track taken from her 1971 John Lennon-produced album Fly. Listen to “Mind Train” below:


ON THIS DAY: JOHN LENNON AND FRANK ZAPPA JAMMED AT THE FILLMORE EAST

By Posted on 0 24

In the last days of New York’s Fillmore East, John Lennon and Yoko Ono joined Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention onstage after the Mothers’ set. The four songs performed on June 6, 1971, were recorded and released on Lennon’s 1972 album Some Time in New York City and later on Zappa’s 1992 live LP Playground Psychotics.

 

The session had its genesis in a Lennon and Ono interview conducted by Village Voice writer Howard Smith on his WPLJ-FM show. At the end of the interview, Smith, who was off to talk to Zappa at the guitarist’s hotel, asked Lennon if he would like to come along. Lennon, a fan of Zappa’s music, said yes.

“A journalist in New York City woke me up – knocked on the door and is standing there with a tape recorder and goes, ‘Frank, I’d like to introduce you to John Lennon,’ you know, waiting for me to gasp and fall on the floor,” Zappa recalled on his 1984 Interview Picture Disc. “And I said, ‘Well, okay. Come on in.’

“And we sat around and talked, and I think the first thing he said to me was, ‘You’re not as ugly as I thought you would be.’ So anyway, I thought he had a pretty good sense of humor so I invited him to come down and jam with us at the Fillmore East. We had already booked in a recording truck because we were making the Live at the Fillmore album at the time.”

The Fillmore East audience, awaiting an encore by the Mothers, was surprised to see Lennon and Ono take the stage. The group opened with “Well (Baby Please Don’t Go),” a 1958 tune by the Olympics. “This is a song I used to sing when I was at the Cavern in Liverpool,” Lennon announced. “I haven’t done it since.”

“We went down there and I did an old Olympics number, the B-side of “Young Blood,” Lennon told the BBC. “It was a 12-bar kind of thing I used to do at the Cavern. … It was pretty good with Zappa because he’s pretty far out, as they say, so we blended quite well.”

Ono’s spacey vocals did blend well with the Mothers’ freaked-out progressive rock. Three improvisational numbers followed: First was a take on “King Kong,” a song from the Mothers’ 1969 album Uncle Meat. Next was “Scumbag,” in which the title is repeated over and over. (In case the audience didn’t get the point, Ono was covered head-to-toe by a bag as she sang.) The jam wrapped with “Aaawk” (which was retitled “Au” on the Lennon album).

Three weeks later, the Fillmore East closed. When Some Time in New York City was released the following year, Zappa was surprised that “King Kong” was now called “Jamrag” – British slang for a sanitary napkin – and credited to Lennon and Ono.

“After they had sat in with us, an arrangement was made that we would both have access to the tapes,” Zappa continued. “He wanted to release it with his mix, and I had the right to release it with my mix – so that’s how that one section came about. The bad part is, there’s a song that I wrote called ‘King Kong’ which we played that night, and I don’t know whether it was Yoko’s idea or John’s idea, but they changed the name of the song to ‘Jamrag,’ gave themselves writing and publishing credit on it, stuck it on an album and never paid me. It was obviously not a jam session song – it’s got a melody, it’s got a bass line, it’s obviously an organized song. Little bit disappointing.”

 


NEW BOOK: “IMAGINE” By JOHN LENNON & YOKO ONO

By Posted on 0 , 19

Imagine Hardcover – October 9, 2018

Press Release:

A lot has been written about the creation of the song, the album and the film of Imagine, mainly by people who weren’t there, so I’m very pleased and grateful that now, for the first time, so many of the participants have kindly given their time to “gimme some truth” in their own words and pictures.” – Yoko Ono

In 1971, John Lennon and Yoko Ono conceived and recorded the critically acclaimed album Imagine at their Georgian country home, Tittenhurst Park, in Berkshire, England, and in the state-of-the-art studio they built in the grounds and at the Record Plant in New York. The lyrics of its title track were inspired by Yoko Ono’s ‘event scores’ in her 1964 book Grapefruit, and she was officially co-credited as writer in June 2017.

Imagine tells the story of John & Yoko’s life, work and relationship during this intensely creative period. It transports readers to home and working environments through artfully compiled narrative film stills, Yoko’s closely guarded archive photos and artefacts, and stitched-together panoramas taken from outtake film footage that recreate the interiors in evocative detail.

Each chapter and song is introduced with text by John & Yoko compiled from published and unpublished sources and complemented by comments from Yoko today. Fresh insights are provided by musicians, engineers and staff who took part, many of whom feature on the inner sleeve’s enigmatic picture wheel, in which the identities are finally revealed. All the minutiae is examined: the locations, the key players, the music and lyrics, the production techniques and the artworks – including the creative process behind the double exposure polaroids used on the album cover.

With a message as universal and pertinent today as it was when the album was created, Imagine cements John and Yoko’s place in cultural history.

PRE-ORDER HERE:

USA: H E R E .

UK  : H E R E .

DOUBLE FANTASY JOHN AND YOKO AT MUSEUM OF LIVERPOOL

By Posted on 0 , 9

DOUBLE FANTASY – JOHN & YOKO
18 May 2018 to 22 April 2019
Museum of Liverpool, Pier Head, Liverpool Waterfront, Liverpool L3 1DG

In a world first, the Museum of Liverpool will host this ground-breaking exhibition telling John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s story in their own words. The exhibition explores the personal and creative chemistry of this iconic couple and their ongoing Imagine Peace campaign.

Double Fantasy – John & Yoko is a free exhibition, celebrating the meeting of two of the world’s most creative artists who expressed their deep and powerful love for one another through their art, music and film. They used their fame and influence to campaign for peace and human rights across the world, transforming not only their own lives, but art, music and activism forever.
Featuring personal objects alongside art, music and film produced by both John and Yoko, the exhibition is drawn from Yoko’s own private collection, some of which has never been displayed.
“I am so happy and grateful that we are having our Double Fantasy – John & Yoko show in Liverpool. This is where John was born and I know John would be very happy too. We were a very simple couple just loving each other every day and I just wanted to show the simple truth of us. In our personal life we were pretty simple people, and we made all sorts of things with love for each other. Everything was made out of love. We found that we were both very strongly interested in world peace. I feel John and I are still working together. I always feel his warmth next to me.” Yoko Ono Lennon

Taking a chronological journey, the exhibition starts with two unique individuals – a leading figure in the avant-garde art world and a global rock ‘n’ roll star. From a tender first meeting at Indica Gallery in London, it was 18 months later that the album ‘Unfinished Music No. 1: Two Virgins’ was issued. What followed was breathtaking in its rapidity and productivity until John’s tragic and untimely death on 8 December 1980.
Through interviews, quotes and lyrics, the story of their personal and creative relationship along with their political activism and peace campaigning, will be told in their own words for the very first time.

From the intimate to the iconic, the exhibition brings together unmissable objects and artworks, including:
• Hand-written lyrics by John Lennon, including ‘In My Life’, ‘Give Peace a Chance’, ‘Happy Christmas War is Over’ and ‘Woman’.
• ‘Grapefruit’ – Yoko’s artist book, which she gave to John as a gift in 1966. Published in 1964, the book represents a seminal piece of conceptual art and was a direct influence on the lyrics and ideas behind ‘Imagine’.
• Original artwork by both, including Yoko’s ‘Ceiling Painting/Yes Painting’, ‘Painting to Hammer a Nail’ and ‘Apple’ as well as ‘The Daily Howl’, a hand-made book by John from his childhood and numerous examples of his distinctive line drawings. The exhibition also features conceptual work the couple produced together, such as ‘War is Over’, Plastic Ono Band’ and elements of their first collaboration ‘Acorn Peace’.
• Many personal items, such as John’s wire-rimmed glasses, Yoko’s large Porsche sunglasses, iconic items of clothing, such as John’s New York City t-shirt, and items from their wedding outfits.
• An extremely rare Sardonyx guitar used by John on the album ‘Double Fantasy’, and the acoustic Gibson guitar, illustrated on by John, from their 1969 bed-in.
• John’s hard-won Green Card.
• Items from the the couple’s famous 1969 Bed-Ins in Amsterdam and Montreal.
• A rolling programme of the films that John and Yoko created, and music videos made under Yoko’s supervision. A music room, overlooking the Mersey with the couple’s albums played for visitors will feature album cover art.
• A recreation of the ‘Imagine’ mosaic circle in Strawberry Fields, Central Park, New York. An intimate and contemplative space, it will also reflect on the global impact of John’s death.

Double Fantasy – John & Yoko is a major part of Liverpool’s celebration of its 10th anniversary as European Capital of Culture.
This exhibition has been made possible with the kind permission of Yoko Ono Lennon.

Image: Photo by Keith McMillan © Yoko Ono

JOHN LENNON FILMING ‘HOW I WON THE WAR’

By Posted on 0 , 17

In the fall of 1966, Look magazine’s European editor Leonard Gross and photographer Douglas Kirkland visited John Lennon on-location during the filming of ‘How I Won The War.’ The article, entitled ‘John Lennon: A Shorn Beatle Tries It On His Own’, would be published in Look ,1966

Whoever would have dreamed that beneath that mop lurked a Renaissance man? Yet there, shorn, sits John Lennon, champion minstrel, literary Beatle, coarse truthsayer, who turned Christendom on with one wildly misunderstood gibe at cant. Now, face white, tunic red, playing wounded in a field of weeds, this pop-rock De Vinci is proposing to act for real. Relaxed to all appearances, he is all knots inside. “I was just a bundle of nerves the first day. I couldn’t hardly speak I was so nervous. My first speech was in a forest, on patrol. I was suppose to say, ‘My heart’s not in it any more’ and it wasn’t. I went home and said to myself, ‘Either you’re not going to be like that, or you’re going to give up.’”
As he casts his weak brown eyes at the camera, the entire movie company jockeys for a glimpse. “I don’t mind talking to the camera — it’s people that throw me.”
Sure enough, he blows his lines. He waggles his head in shame. “Sorry about that.” But under the low-key coaxing of Director Dick Lester, Beatle John becomes Private Gripweed, a complex British orderly, in a film, How I Won The War.

Lennon at 26, said: “I feel I want to be them all– painter, writer, actor, singer, player, musician. I want to try them all, and I’m lucky enough to be able to. I want to see which one turns me on. This is for me, this film, because apart from wanting to do it because of what it stands for, I want to see what I’ll be like when I’ve done it.” “I don’t want people taking things from me that aren’t really me. They make you something that they want to make you, that isn’t really you. They come and talk to find answers, but they’re their answers, not us. We’re not Beatles to each other, you know. It’s a joke to us. If we’re going out the door of the hotel, we say, ‘Right! Beatle John! Beatle George now! Come on, let’s go!’ We don’t put on a false front or anything. But we just know that leaving the door, we turn into Beatles because everybody looking at us sees the Beatles. We’re not the Beatles at all. We’re just us.” “But we made it, and we asked for it to an extent, and that’s how it’s going to be. That’s why George is in India (studying the sitar,) and I’m here. Because we’re a bit tired of going out the door, and the only way to soften the blow is just to spread it a bit.”

In that kind of mood, a Dick Lester set was just the therapy for Lennon. Each man is the kind who makes the New Theologians jump. To them, the individual is more thrill than threat — a unique being who should be taken for what he is. Lester, who directed both Beatle films, gratefully recalls his first meeting with the group, when the movies were just an idea. “They allowed me to be what I damn well pleased. I didn’t have to put on an act for them, and they didn’t put one on for me.” This is what a Lester set is like: Once more, they are in a deserted German square, now, with all the paraphernalia of movie-making, with British ‘soldiers,’ Lennon among them, ready to comb the streets, with German ‘soldiers’ lying in wait. “Quiet please!” an assistant shouts — just as a little boy walks into the scene. Apoplectic, the assistant rushes forward and shoves the child aside. Lester, whose normal weapon is humor, flushes. “Don’t push!” he commands.

Lennon’s lack of pretense astonished the actors. “He’s someone who just tries anything,” one of them marveled. “No stand-in, no special treatment, no chair for him.” During a break for tea one raw morning, Lennon queued with the rest. When his turn arrived, his heart’s desire was gone. “You don’t have to be a star to get a cheese sandwich,” he mused. “You just have to be first.” They like his humor too. That same morning, a German mother pushed her three-year-old son up to the Beatle, clutching his autograph book in his hand. “Sign it!” she demanded. Lennon did as bidden, telling the boy, “Yes, sir, you put us where we are today.” On location in Spain one afternoon, the script required Lennon to drive a troop carrier along the beach. Accelerating too fast, he spun the wheels; the rear of the carrier sank. As his crestfallen director approached the cab, Lennon peered sheepishly over his glasses and gave him a limp salute.

“The class thing is just as snobby as it ever was. People like us can break through a little — but only a little. Once, we went into this restaurant and nearly got thrown out for looking like we looked until they saw who it was. ‘What do you want? What do you want?’ the headwaiter said, ‘We’ve come to bloody eat, that’s what we want,’ we said. The owner spotted us and said, ‘Ah, a table sir, over here, sir.’ It just took me back to when I was 19, and I couldn’t get anywhere without being stared at or remarked about. It’s only since I’ve been a Beatle that people have said, ‘Oh, wonderful, come in, come in,’ and I’ve forgotten a bit about what they’re really thinking. They see the shining star, but when there’s no glow about you, they only see the clothes and the haircut again.”

“I’m not a cynic. They’re getting my character out of some of things I write or say. They can’t do that. I hate tags. I’m slightly cynical, but I’m not a cynic. One can be wry one day and cynical the next and ironic the next. I’m a cynic about most things that are taken for granted. I’m cynical about society, politics, newspapers, government. But I’m not cynical about life, love, goodness, death. That’s why I really don’t want to be labeled a cynic.”
It is in the context of the young man who recoils at distortion that his now-famous remark should be viewed.

source:videomuzic.eu