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Tag Archives PAUL MCCARTNEY

PAUL AT SUNCORP STADIUM IN BRISBANE

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Paul performs at Suncorp Stadium in Brisbane, on 9 December.

 



Setlist:
01): ‘A Hard Day’s Night’
02): ‘Junior’s Farm’
03): ‘Can’t Buy Me Love’
04): ‘Jet’
05): ‘All My Loving’
06): ‘Let Me Roll It’-‘Foxy Lady’
07): ‘I’ve Got A Feeling’
08): ‘My Valentine’
09): ‘Nineteen Hundred And Eighty-Five’
10): ‘Maybe I’m Amazed’
11): ‘I’ve Just Seen A Face’
12): ‘In Spite Of All The Danger’
13): ‘You Won’t See Me’
14): ‘Love Me Do’
15): ‘And I Love Her’
16): ‘Blackbird’
17): ‘Here Today’
18): ‘Queenie Eye’
19): ‘New’
20): ‘Lady Madonna’
21): ‘FourFiveSeconds’
22): ‘Eleanor Rigby’
23): ‘I Wanna Be Your Man’
24): ‘Being For The Benefit Of Mr. Kite!’’
25): ‘Something’
26): Popurrí: ‘A Day In The Life’-‘Give Peace A Chance’
27): ‘Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da’
28): ‘Band On The Run’
29): ‘Back In The U.S.S.R.’
30): ‘Let It Be’
31): ‘Live And Let Die’
32): ‘Hey Jude’

Encore:
33) ‘Yesterday’
34) ‘Get Back’
35) ‘Mull Of Kintyre’
36) ‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’ (Reprise)
37) ‘Helter Skelter’
38)‘Golden Slumbers’-‘Carry That Weight’-‘The End’

 

 

 

 

Paul with Anthony “Ant” McPartlin and Declan “Dec” Donnelly ,backstage in Brisbane.

 


PAUL: SONGWRITING WITH JOHN WAS ‘COMPETITIVE’

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Paul relished the “competitive” nature of his relationship with John Lennon. The iconic duo penned some of the most famous songs in history during their days with the Beatles, and Sir Paul has revealed how the late star’s determination to be the best helped to improve his own songwriting.

He explained: “It was quite competitive because if I wrote something he’d try and better it and then I’d try and better that, so it’s a good system.

“It means you’re going up a staircase and each time you’re trying to make it better, so if that works it can make the song very good … and in our case memorable. “That was the trick because we couldn’t put it down, we couldn’t put it on a recording like today, you just had to remember it. So that was a good restriction too, it meant if you forgot it, too bad. “So, it had to have a hook and nearly always, even if you forgot it in the evening, you’d go out for a drink and say, ‘what was that bloody song’. You’d wake up in the morning an go ‘oh yeah, I remember!’ It would just come back.”

The Beatles split in 1970, but Paul never considered quitting music altogether, admitting it remains his obsession.

He told Australia’s ABC: “It was either that or quit. And that was the decision at the time but I realised I liked music too much and if I quit, I’d still be doing it as a hobby.

“If you’re a good cook, and they suddenly say ‘Ok, you’ve won MasterChef’, it’s not like you’re going to stop cooking. “It’s something you love doing, same for me, it’s something I love. “I’m always surprised when a song comes because I started with nothing and suddenly get a little idea I’m chasing and go ‘ah, is this good?’. If you write something decent, you feel good. It’s all part of the same thing. It can be a little bit of a therapy thing to.”

source:Thespec


PAUL: THE SECRET BEATLES HIT WRITTEN IN NEW ZEALAND

By Posted on 0 14

Over the following week he’ll play five more shows across the Ditch before finally playing Mt Smart Stadium next Saturday night.

“We’re practising on the Aussies,” he jokes. “Getting up to speed.”

In a summer crammed with big shows, McCartney’s is undoubtedly the biggest. As a Beatle he wrote songs that, quite literally, changed the world. Now, after nearly a quarter of a century he’s back. His last gig here was in 1993. That’s a long time between drinks.

“It is, yeah,” he laughs. “For a lot of that time I was having to be Daddy and do the school run. I had a young kid I was bringing up, so I couldn’t get enough time away to make it practical.”

He’d planned to visit in 2002, as part of the Driving tour, but the Bali terrorist attack in Kuta prevented it.

“We thought we can’t go waltzing in with a happy show while the whole country’s in mourning, so we had to call that off.”

An odd footnote in Beatles trivia is that the Fab Four toured here at the height of Beatlemania in 1964, playing all four main centres. Does he remember much about that tour?

“I remember rubbing noses with the Maori,” McCartney answers, referencing the traditional hongi greeting that welcomed the band at the airport. “That was very good.”

News reports from the time suggest a sleepy country struggling to comprehend, let alone contain, Beatlemania. Woefully inadequate policing levels struggled with unprecedented crowds and the band was besieged by screaming fans.

“It was a lot of screaming girls, which was great, ’cause we were screaming boys,” Paul recalls.

One headline shrieked, “Screams and eggs greet the Beatles,” and led with this wonderfully loony paragraph: “The Beatles are in New Zealand. And they were met by deafening screaming, singing and yelling, Maori songs, and eggs – hurled at them.”

“I don’t actually remember that,” Paul laughs when asked about the eggs. “But you block out all those things, don’t you?”

Instead, he remembers the tour fondly.

“It was lovely to finally get to New Zealand, to experience a place we’d heard so much about. Coming from Liverpool a lot of people you knew had relatives who’d emigrated. I felt the bond with New Zealanders. It was great. We had a lot of fun. The shows were really good. That’s always the main memories, enjoying the crowds.”

He briefly pauses, and says, “I don’t remember any eggs, anyway. I just remember having a good time.”

That good time also includes a yarn that’s slipped into local Beatles lore. While trapped in their Wellington hotel, he requested a guitar so he could work on a song. He got the guitar, accounts differ on how, but no one knows what song he was working on.

“Let’s pretend it was Yesterday,” he quips, when asked to shed some light on this mystery. “No, it’s a little too long ago to remember. It might have been a great mysterious lost song … I don’t think there was a lost song, because I normally remembered those songs. But it would have been one of the songs throughout that period that we recorded.”

Whichever song it was, I’ll Follow the Sun perhaps, maybe I’ve Just Seen a Face or, probably not but let’s pretend, Yesterday, there’s a good chance he’ll play it next Saturday.

That’s because Paul’s playing more Beatles material now than ever. His set’s packed with it. Onstage for over three hours he’ll play far more Beatles tunes than the Beatles did during their 28-minute New Zealand sets.

“The first thing I ever do when trying to choose the setlist is think, ‘If I was going to this show, what would I want to see them do?’,” he explains. “There’s certain songs I wouldn’t want to see the band leave out. Those start the list. Then you go on from there.

“Sometimes I’ll hear something over the radio and think, ‘Oh, I’d love to do that,’ so we’ll take it into rehearsal and learn it up.”

Then, a surprise confession.

“Sometimes it’s a bit daunting because in the early days of recording, you know with The Beatles, sometimes I wouldn’t put the bass part on ’til we’d done the song. That enabled me to get quite complex with the bass lines.”

Because The Beatles had retired from touring this was never a problem. Until now…

“When it came to do it live it was like, ‘Oh my God. I’ve really set myself a problem’. I’ve got this complicated bass line and I’ve got to sing this song that’s going in a completely different direction. It’s one of those co-ordination things. There are a few that I’ve got to concentrate. They’re quite hard to do, particularly the ones with the crazy bass lines. But it’s good to have a challenge. I wouldn’t like to be phoning it in.”

He says sometimes he fluffs it, “that used to really panic me, the shame of it all”, but nowadays he’ll just stop the band and restart.

“It proves we’re live,” he says. “The funny thing is, the audience like it. It gives them a special memory, ‘remember when they blew it?’.”

That audience connection is the thing he’s enjoying the most.

“There may be thousands of people there but there’s something about the show which feels like I’m talking to you directly,” he says. “It’s me and you.”

Coming from anyone else, it’d be easy to be sceptical, but when the guy who has written some of the world’s sincerest love songs says it, you believe him.

“Why I write about love, I think it’s a great feeling. It’s a universal feeling. That’s the one thing that ties everybody on this planet together. Whether you’re single, married, young, old, life involves love in one way or another. It’s a very special thing.

“Sometimes I think I don’t want to get too soppy, I don’t want to get too corny, but I do like the subject so much that I find myself returning to it.”

His car’s pulled into the stadium now and the singer’s got to sing a song. He genuinely wants you all to sing along. We’ll get our chance next weekend. I can’t wait.

“Great, man,” he enthuses. “I know we’re gonna have some fun.”

Then Paul McCartney, one of the world’s greatest musicians, reassures me by saying, “I’m practising!”

LOWDOWN
Who: Paul McCartney
When: Next Saturday night
Where: Mt Smart Stadium. Tickets available


PAUL AT AAMI PARK, MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA

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Paul at AAMI PARK, Melbourne, Australia – 6 December

    

 


Paul McCartney Australia and New Zealand dates:
Sat 9 Dec | Suncorp Stadium, Brisbane, QLD (All Ages)
Mon 11 and 12 Dec | Qudos Bank Arena, Sydney, NSW (All Ages)
Sat 16 Dec | Mt Smart Stadium, Auckland, NZ (All Ages)

Paul McCartney tickets .. H E R E .


PAUL ON THE UNHEARD STORIES BEHIND HIS ICONIC SONGS

By Posted on 0 12

Currently in Australia for the ‘One on One’ tour, Paul took time between his big shows to Take 5 (and a half) with Zan Rowe, diving into his impossibly influential back catalogue to give the stories behind some of his most iconic songs.
Paul spoke with shining wit and wisdom. From examining his relationship with John Lennon to reinventing himself after The Beatles and getting robbed of demos in Lagos, here’s some highlights. Beginning with Paul’s collaboration with Kanye West…

Separating noodles from spaghetti
“I was sitting around with Kanye for a couple of days and I didn’t think we’d written a song, ‘cause I was just playing around, noodling. I was expecting for an idea to come out there and then, but his way of working is he takes all these little noodles away and he makes spaghetti. …He’ll play with it and curate it and do this with it and get somebody else to do another bit. So, it was months later when I got a track in the post and it was ‘FourFiveSeconds’ and I listened to it and it’s Rihanna singing. I thought ‘This is great, I love her singing it’ but I had to ring up and say ‘Am I on this?’, you know. Yeah, they said ‘You wrote all the guitar parts and that inspired us’. I said ‘Okay, great thanks’.

Paul’s wife didn’t exactly approve of ‘All Day’
“He uses the ‘N’ word about 40 times and when I played it, first of all, my wife Nancy said ‘You can’t be involved with that!’ I said, ‘Well it’s not me saying it – it’s Kanye’. It makes a difference because he’s using it in a completely different way from how a white person might use it. So, I liked it. I thought it was a good record. It got nominated for a Grammy. But that’s the kind of way we worked: I bring up this pretty little tune and he translates it into this great big urban riff.”

On writing with John Lennon
“It was quite competitive because if I wrote something he’d try and better it and then I’d try and better that, so it’s a good system. It means you’re going up a staircase and each time you’re trying to make it better, so if that works it can make the song very good… and in our case memorable. That was the trick because we couldn’t put it down, we couldn’t put it on a recording like today, you just had to remember it. So that was a good restriction too, it meant if you forgot it, too bad.
“So, it had to have a hook and nearly always, even if you forgot it in the evening, you’d go out for a drink and say, ‘what was that bloody song’. You’d wake up in the morning an go ‘oh yeah, I remember!’ It would just come back.”

On going solo and re-inventing himself after The Beatles
“It was either that or quit. And that was the decision at the time but I realised I liked music too much and if I quit, I’d still be doing it as a hobby.

“…If you’re a good cook, and they suddenly say ‘Ok, you’ve won MasterChef’, it’s not like you’re going to stop cooking. It’s something you love doing, same for me, it’s something I love. I’m always surprised when a song comes because I started with nothing and suddenly get a little idea I’m chasing and go ‘ah, is this good?’. If you write something decent, you feel good. It’s all part of the same thing. It can be a little bit of a therapy thing to.
“I think that’s the thing – you get hooked, on this idea you can sit down, noodle around, and maybe something magical will happen. And you don’t know how it happens, that’s the nice thing. Songwriting is really quite mysterious. With cooking, you know kind of what these ingredients are going to make. You don’t know how good it’s going to be, but you have a rough idea. Songwriting it can go in any old direction, you can suddenly have something, hopefully good that you’ve never done before. It’s quite addictive.”

Songwriting isn’t journalism
“[Jet is] a little bit about the experiences I’d had in marrying Linda. Her dad was a little old fashioned and I thought I was a little bit intimidated as a lot of young guys can be meeting the father figure… Anyway, the song starts to be about the sergeant major and it was basically my experience roughly translated.
“I never do a song with the actual words that actually happen because then that’s like a news story. ‘[singing] Oh Linda, I was going to see your Dad and he was intimidating.’ A bit boring. So I mask it and mould it into a song, something you can sing reasonably.”
On being robbed in Lagos, Nigeria
“I got held up at knifepoint and one of the things they took, among cameras and tape recorders, was this cassette, which I don’t think the robbers would be interested in. My theory is they probably recorded over it, ‘What’s this? Just some rubbish’. So, I just had to remember all the songs, I had lyric sheets for them… so I did. But it was quite hairy getting held up one dark night in Lagos. The joke was, I thought these guys – five local black guys in a car – I thought they were offering me a lift and we’d been warned, me and Linda, ‘Whatever you do, don’t go walking late at night. Because it’s a little bit dangerous.’
“I thought ‘Nah, we’re from Liverpool, we don’t worry about that’. So we’re walking along, the car comes up, the guy jumps out and he’s about to say something and I go ‘That’s so nice of you… It’s ok, I know, I know – we’re walking.” They stopped about a 100 yards later and tried again. I completely thought they were just offering us a lift but one of them had a knife. It became clear they weren’t giving us a lift. And that’s when I lost the cassette to ‘Band on the Run’.”

On ‘The End’ being a fitting swansong for The Beatles
“I didn’t think of it as the end of The Beatles, I think of it mainly as the end of an album. But I just had that little couplet: ‘in the end, you love you take/is equal to the love you make’ I liked that as a sentiment and as a mini-poem. That came on the end of the album and that song, quite luckily.”
“It is good as you say, everyone got to do their bit. I don’t analyse my stuff but if I was to, that’d be a good one to analyse. You’ve got John, George, Ringo, – that’s sewing it all up. You get Ringo, does his drum solo, which he would never do we had to really persuade him to do [a] drum solo.”

source:abcnet