Sign up with your email address to be the first to know about new products, VIP offers, blog features & more.

THE HIT BADFINGER SONG THAT FEATURED GEORGE HARRISON ON SLIDE GUITAR

By Posted on 1 No tags 14

George Harrison produced and played slide guitar on Badfinger’s hit ‘Day After Day’.
When The Beatles launched Apple in 1968, the band members became record executives, and George and Paul dove into the work. In addition to working on Lomax’s album, the two made sure James Taylor got onto Apple, and both Beatles played on Taylor’s debut album.

But the first act signed to Apple was Badfinger, a group that began as The Iveys, with members from Wales and Liverpool. After a name change and the help of a Paul song (“Come and Get It”), Badfinger scored its first hit in late ’69.

After the Beatles’ early ’70 breakup, it came time for George’s debut album (All Things Must Paas), and Badfinger guitarists Pete Ham and Joey Molland (plus bassist Tom Evans) all contributed acoustic guitar on the record, while Mike Gibbins played drums.

When Badfinger had problems with the band’s 1971 record Straight Up, George stepped in, producing four tracks. “Day After Day,” on which he played slide guitar, sounds like it could have gone on All Things Must Pass. And it had the same type of success as that record’s singles.
The George touch pushed ‘Day After Day’ to No. 4 on the Billboard charts

The Paul-produced “Come and Get It” was Badfinger’s introduction to the U.S. market, and the single cracked the top 10 (peaking at No. 7) in April ’70. When George offered up his production skills the following year, Badfinger went with a track written by Ham that suited the band even better.

 

George’s idea to double Ham’s slide guitar with a part of his own definitely brought a distinctive sound to “Day After Day.” In the U.S., the single reached the highest Billboard chart position (No. 4) Badfinger managed.

That was the peak in many ways for Badfinger.

cheatsheet


1 Response
  • Swansea Jack
    Monday, October 19, 2020

    A friend of mine, the late Gary Pickford-Hopkins, was lead singer with Wild Turkey. They were touring the USA as a support act. In New York Gary was waiting for the elevator in his hotel. When the doors opened who should walk out but Pete Ham. Both had played the same circuit near Swansea in South Wales and were friends. Gary suggested they met up for a meal. Pete said he couldn’t because he didn’t have any money. Gary was shocked. He said: how can you be skint when you are number 4 in the charts?
    In the end Gary paid. But the above memory encapsulates the sad story of Badfinger.

Comments
Welcome. Please let your comment here, thank you. Name/Nickname and comment are required. Email address will not be displayed.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *