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RINGO STARR MOVES 2020 ALL STARR BAND TOUR TO 2021

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Ringo Starr has announced that he is rescheduling his 2020 North American tour with his All Starr Band to 2021, citing concern and caution for the well being of fans, crew and staff due to the Covid-19 crisis. The lineup remains intact: Steve Lukather, Colin Hay, Gregg Rolie, Warren Ham, Gregg Bissonette, and Hamish Stuart. The spring 2021 tour will include a mini residency at New York’s Beacon Theatre.

“This is very difficult for me,” said Starr, in the March 27 announcement. “In 30 years I think I’ve only missed 2 or 3 gigs nevermind a whole tour. But this is how things are for all of us now, I have to stay in just like you have to stay in, and we all know it’s the peace and loving thing we do for each other.”

Two dates will include Americana band, the Avett Brothers. (No longer on the schedule are performances in Bangor, Me., and Mexico.) Tickets already purchased for the 2020 dates will be honored at the 2021 performances. Tickets are available for purchase here.

The original 2020 tour was announcement on Nov. 4, 2019, on the heels of the release of Ringo’s 20th studio album, What’s My Name. The title track is a rousing anthem written by a returning All Starr Band member, Colin Hay, that turns a familiar chant from Ringo’s live shows into a rousing rocker.

The album is the latest in a series of recordings that Starr has produced in his home studio and a distinguished cast of musical friends playing along with Ringo, including Paul McCartney, Joe Walsh, Winter, Dave Stewart, Benmont Tench, Lukather, Nathan East, Hay, Richard Page, Warren Ham, and more.

Ringo, who turns 80 on July 7, recently released Another Day in the Life, the third in his series of books with Genesis Publications, that follows the sell-out success of Postcards From the Boys (2003) and Photograph (2013), and features previously unpublished collection of his photographs, captioned with his own thoughts and anecdotes.

 

Ringo Starr and his All Starr Band 2021 Tour (Tickets are available HERE)
Date TBA – Casino Rama – Rama, Ontario (prev. May 29, 2020)
Date TBA – Casino Rama – Rama, Ontario (prev. May 30)
Jun 01 – Paramount Theatre – Asbury Park, NJ (prev. June 14)
Jun 03 – Boch Center Wang Theatre – Boston, MA (With The Avett Brothers) (prev. June 10)
Jun 05 – Bank of NH Pavilion – Gilford, NH (With The Avett Brothers) (prev. June 11)
Jun 07 – State Theatre – Easton, PA (prev. June 6)
Jun 08 – Beacon Theatre – New York, NY (prev. June 2)
Jun 09 – Beacon Theatre – New York, NY (prev. June 3)
Jun 11 – Beacon Theatre – New York, NY (prev. June 5)
Jun 12 – Hackensack Meridian Health Theatre – Red Bank, NJ (prev. June 7)
Jun 13 – Providence Perf. Arts Center – Providence, RI (prev. June 13)
Jun 15 – Modell Lyric Theatre – Baltimore, MD (prev. June 16)
Jun 16 – Modell Lyric Theatre – Baltimore, MD (prev. June 17)
Jun 18 – PPG Paints Arena – Pittsburgh, PA (prev. June 20)
Jun 19 – Tanglewood – Lenox, MA (prev. June 19)
Jun 20 – Metropolitan Opera House – Philadelphia, PA (prev. June 21)
Jun 22 – Cobb Energy Centre – Atlanta, GA (prev. June 23)
Jun 23 – Cobb Energy Centre – Atlanta, GA (prev. June 24)
Jun 25 – St Augustine Amphitheatre – St Augustine, FL (prev. June 26)
Jun 26 – Hard Rock Casino – Hollywood, FL (prev. June 27)
Jun 27 – Ruth Eckerd Hall – Clearwater, FL (prev. June 28)
Jun 09 – Cross Insurance Center – Bangor, ME (With The Avett Brothers)

Oct 20 – Auditorio Nacional – Ciudad de Mexico, MX

Do not miss the opportunity to see Ringo perform live! Choose from a large assortment of cheap pop tickets&buy yours today!… HERE .

‘LIVE IN NEW YORK CITY’: JOHN LENNON’S FULL-LENGTH LIVE APPEARANCE

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John Lennon has two live albums in his solo catalogue, the Live Peace In Toronto 1969 with the Plastic Ono Band and another that was recorded three years later in New York City. Whereas the first came out contemporaneously the Live In New York City album was released posthumously in 1986.

Recorded on 30 August 1972 at Madison Square Garden, Lennon performed two shows, one in the afternoon and one in the evening, to raise money for children with mental health issues. Released in February 1986, the album made the US charts on 22 March and peaked shortly after at No.41.

Live In New York City was John Lennon’s last full-length concert performance, shortly after the release of Some Time in New York City. The concerts, billed as ‘One to One’, also featured Stevie Wonder, Roberta Flack, Melanie Safka and Sha-Na-Na, but none of their performances are featured on the album or subsequent video release.

Backing Lennon and Yoko Ono were Elephant’s Memory, who played on Some Time in New York City. The material that was performed was largely drawn from John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band, Imagine and Some Time in New York City, but also included ‘Come Together’ from the Beatles’ Abbey Road and covered Elvis Presley’s ‘Hound Dog’ before finishing with, ‘Give Peace a Chance’.

There is a poignancy to this album as it was the only rehearsed and full-length live performances of John’s solo career, and his first – and last – formal, live concerts since the Beatles retired from the road in 1966.

Yoko produced the album and these two concerts also marked the last time that John and Yoko performed together on stage. Sadly it is no longer available, but it would be fitting tribute if it were once again added to John’s solo catalogue.

udiscovermusic

GEORGE HARRISON’S FOUNDATION DONATES HALF A MILLION TO COVID-19 RELIEF

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George Harrison’s Material World Foundation has donated $500,000 to COVID-19 relief. The foundation — started by the late Beatle in 1973 with the release of the LP Living in the Material World — donated the funds to MusiCare’s COVID-19 Foundation, Save the Children, and Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders).

In addition, the foundation launched “The Inner Light Challenge,” in which users across the globe share a line, verse, or chorus from the Beatles’ 1968 B side — featured in a new lyric-video below. One dollar will be donated to pandemic relief for every person who posts the clip with the hashtag #innerlight2020, with a maximum of $100,000.

Harrison’s son, Dhani, covers “The Inner Light” in the clip above. “Without going out of my door/I can know all things on earth,” he sings, ringing a Tibetan singing bowl while sitting on a couch. “Without looking out of my window/I could know the ways of heaven.”

“These lyrics sung by George are a positive reminder to all of us who are isolating, in quarantine, or respecting the request to shelter in place,” Harrison’s widow, Olivia, said in a statement. “Let’s get and stay connected at this difficult time. There are things we can do to help, and we invite you to share your Inner Light.”

Dhani recently revived his father’s record label, Dark Horse Records, and has plans for previously unreleased material to see the light of day. “It’s the family business, as they say,” “It’s funny — if you’re a plumber and want to be in the family plumbing business, no one would think anything about that. That would be normal. But in our family, the family business is music, so I’m just doing what mum and dad did. No one is making us do it. We have to do it.”

VIDEO…Here.

Ringo and Paul on initiative #innerlight2020…
“I am sending Peace and Love to everyone and hope you are staying healthy and safe. I want to thank and support Dhani and Olivia for this great campaign to help to fight Covid 19. Peace and love,” Ringo

“When we find ourselves in times of trouble… Happy to support Dhani and Olivia with this very worthwhile cause. Great song, wonderful initiative #innerlight2020” – Paul


“THERE´S NOTHING TO FORGIVE” : PETE BEST ON BEING SACKED FROM THE BEATLES

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Pete Best talks about picking yourself up and getting on with it

Drummer Pete Best is explaining, not for the first time, what it was like for him that late summer’s day in 1962 when he was sacked suddenly from The Beatles, a beat combo from Liverpool who were about to become the biggest band the world had ever seen.

Best recalls an uncomfortable-looking band manager Brian Epstein explaining that other band members John Lennon, Paul McCartney and George Harrison didn’t think his drumming was up to scratch, and that they were replacing Best – who’d been with them for two years through those formative, frenetic Hamburg gigging days – with Ringo Starr.

“We were rockers, we were little hardies, we could handle ourselves. But when I got back home and I told my mother what happened, behind the sanctuary of the front door, I cried like a baby,” he recalls.

Anybody over a certain age who hears the name Pete Best will be familiar with the saga of the so-called “fifth Beatle” and the life he lost out on. Rather aptly, we meet in Lost Lane, a music venue off Grafton Street, where he was due to play a gig on March 29th, now cancelled due to the Covid-19 crisis. But as soon as we start talking, it’s clear that despite the events of 1962 he doesn’t feel lost, and hasn’t for a very long time. He’s 78 now, and looks back with pride not just on his part in Beatle history, but his resilience too.

‘There came a period in my life when I was like, to hell with what happened yesterday’

At the height of Beatlemania, Best attempted suicide, but he has always denied it was because of depression related to being fired. “You should never ask someone who has tried to take their own life why they did it,” he said. “ I don’t know why I did it. All I know is my mother and my brother Rory found me. My mother gave me such a talking to and I vowed I would never do anything like that again. And I never will.”

How did he cope in a world that never lets anyone forget about The Beatles? “I think if I’d kept reflecting about what happened yesterday, all the time, and it was like a nightmare to me, I would have ended up bitter and twisted. But there came a period in my life when I was like, to hell with what happened yesterday it’s about today and tomorrow.”

In the end being an ex-Beatle, and carrying the weight of the criticism of his former bandmates, gave him purpose, a reason to prove himself. Over the years he had to endure public comments from various band members who critiqued his drumming and aspects of his personality in attempts to justify the sacking.

“You’re the Beatle who got kicked out because you were crap. So there’s always been a point where I’ve had to prove myself. I haven’t talked about it, people make their own impressions about what a drummer is about. So I’ll perform on stage and the audience can make their own mind up. I’m glad to say that the consensus of opinion is yeah, you’re a great drummer, Pete. I’m happy with that.”

He might not be John, Paul, George or even Ringo, but he was still a Beatle, which means it’s still a thrill just to hear him talk about his days in the band, “propping up bars across Hamburg” with “gentle, tender John” – he was closest to Lennon – or having mock fights with the band on stage at The Indra club on The Reeperbahn. Or his enduring fondness for I Saw Her Standing There, one of the first Beatles originals he ever played on drums.

Ireland can lay claim to the former Beatle, which is also a bit fab. His grandfather Major Thomas Shaw, who was stationed in India at the time of the Raj, came from Dublin, while his biological father, a soldier who died when he was a baby, was also Irish.

His half-Irish mother Mona Best has her own place in Beatle history. After she was widowed, Mona married again and travelled to Liverpool, where she set up the Casbah club in the basement of their sprawling home, where The Beatles (as The Quarrymen and later The Silver Beetles) played their first gigs.

Even after her son Pete was sacked from the band, Mona kept in touch with the Beatles. “She was very diplomatic,” says Best. When the cover art was being done for Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, Lennon asked Mona if he could borrow her dad’s army medals, and he wore them on the cover of the album.

The medals are one of hundreds of exhibits in the Magical Beatles Museum on Mathew Street in Liverpool, run by Best’s younger brother Roag. (Roag is central to another bit of Beatles lore. His father is Neil Aspinall, the Beatles driver and later the managing director of Apple Corps. Aspinall had an affair with Mona when he was a lodger in the house and her husband was away.)

He had not seen or spoken to him in decades, but Best still cried when he heard of the murder of his old friend John Lennon in 1980. He has never spoken to any of the Beatles since he was forced out of the band. Reparation of sorts came in 1995 when Aspinall called (“Paul McCartney claims he called me but he didn’t,” says Best) to discuss The Beatles Anthology, which was to include some tracks featuring Best’s drumming, for which he would be paid royalties.
It’s another source of pride for Best that seven of the tracks on Anthology 1 feature his drumming: “Seven out of 60 tracks was quite a lot. And I’d like to think with that amount of tracks over a short period of time, it showed the important role I played. Whether that’s the case or not, I don’t know – you’d have to ask them.”
How much money did he get in royalties? “It wasn’t far short of a million,” he says. The money was welcome, even if, as he says, he was “well set” at that stage of his life, having made a good living from being Pete Best of the Beatles and Pete Best, musician in his own right.

He has his Beatles association to thank for another important part of his story – he’s been married to Kathy for 58 years, after first meeting her at a Beatles gig.

Lennon and Harrison are dead now, while Starr had nothing to do with the decision to replace the drummer. So there’s only one Beatle left who was directly involved in the banishing of Pete Best. Does Best forgive McCartney? “I’ve nothing to forgive him about … they made a decision as young men which was safeguarding their future. Okay, it could have been handled better. I was the fall guy for it, I suffered, but I’m not holding them to task over it. If I’d have been in the same situation and I was another member of the band, maybe I’d have been one of the bad guys.”

“I’ve no regrets,” he continues. “I think I’m a lucky guy. I’m very proud of what I’ve achieved as a person, of the examples I’ve set to people to get on with your life, to pick yourself up. I’ve been an inspiration. And I’m proud of that.”

irishtimes