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PAUL MCCARTNEY AND RINGO STARR PAY TRIBUTE TO GEORGE HARRISON ON 20th ANNIVERSARY OF LATE BEATLE´S DEATH

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Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr have shared tributes to late The Beatles bandmate George Harrison on the 20th anniversary of the latter’s passing.

Harrison, died of lung cancer on November 29, 2001 at the age of 58.
McCartney took to Twitter to share an old image of himself and Harrison in the studio with a caption reading: “Hard to believe that we lost George 20 years ago. I miss my friend so much. Love Paul.”

Ringo Starr also took to Instagram to share an image of him and Harrison smoking cigars, saying: “Peace and love to you George I miss you man. Peace and love Ringo”.
George also received a tribute from his widow, Olivia Harrison, who shared a video to her Instagram page that featured a psychedelic photo of Harrison’s face set to his song ‘Within You Without You’, and ended with the words, “We love you, George.”
Meanwhile Peter Jackson’s Disney+ documentary – The Beatles: Get Back – was released last week and garnered a glowing five-star review from NME.

“It is precisely because of Get Back‘s lax editorial policy that it succeeds. You might not be able to say anything new about The Beatles in 2021, but Jackson hasn’t tried. He’s shown us instead,” wrote NME’s Alex Flood.

Earlier this month, Paul addressed the “misconception” that he broke up The Beatles. “I think the biggest misconception at the end of The Beatles was that I broke The Beatles up, and I lived with that for quite a while,” he said. “Once a headline’s out there, it sticks. That was a big one – and I’ve only finally just gotten over it.”

 


PAUL MCCARTNEY SAID HE NEVER GOT ROUND TO TELLING JOHN LENNON HE LOVED HIM-INTERVIEW AT LONDON’s SOUTHBANK CENTER

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Paul McCartney reveals why he could never tell fellow Beatles legend John Lennon he loved him
He said: ‘As 16-year-old, 17-year-old Liverpool kids, you could never say that’
Interview at London’s Southbank Centre, to promote his new book The Lyrics.

Paul said of the pair’s childhood friendship: ‘As 16-year-old, 17-year-old Liverpool kids, you could never say that.

‘It just wasn’t done. So I never did… just say, ‘John, love you man’. I never got round to it. Now it’s great just to realise how much I love this man.’
Describing his youth with Lennon as ‘like walking up a staircase… side by side’, Paul said: ‘I just remember how great it was to work with him and how great he was… because you are not messing around here, you are not just singing with Joe Bloggs. You are singing with John Lennon.’

He added: ‘I realised that as we were making up songs, I would suggest a line and he would suggest a line. That was very much how we did it, just ping-ponging off each other.’
‘Because he was right-handed, for me it was like looking in a mirror. It was great, I could kind of see the chords that I was playing in the mirror.’

Paul’s on-stage interview at London’s Southbank Centre, to promote his new book The Lyrics, represented his first live event in two years.
Reflecting on the band’s break-up in 1970, he said: ‘I think the biggest misconception at the end of The Beatles was that I’d broken The Beatles up.

‘I lived with that for quite a while, saying to people, ‘No I didn’t, no I didn’t’. But once a headline is out there, it sticks.’

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PAUL MCCARTNEY & WINGS “BAND ON THE RUN” BEST POP PERFORMANCE GRAMMY AWARD GIVEN TO DENNY LAINE UP FOR SALE

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It is not very often that a piece of this magnitude is offered up for auction. Especially when it is only one of three identical awards made and presented to an original member of the group, Wings. This is a Grammy award for Best Pop Performance by a Duo Or Group With Vocal for the song “Band on the Run,” presented in 1974 and given to Wings’ multi-instrumentalist and singer, Denny Laine.

The backstory:
Paul McCartney: “I was looking around for somewhere exciting to record the next album. So I thought, a good idea would be to get a list from EMI our record company and all the studios they had ’round the world. It turned out they had one in Africa. We just said, ‘Yeah. Let’s go to Africa.’

“The night before we were due to go [drummer] Denny Seiwell and [guitarist] Henry McCullough rang up and said, ‘Um, we’re not coming. We’re not coming to Africa. We’re leaving the band.’ Oh, great, thank you! At first it was like, ‘Oh no, tragedy!’ But then, I just thought, ‘Right, we’re gonna go and we’re gonna show you. We are going make the best album we’ve ever made!”

Wings co-founder Laine said that he had no idea that the pair had quit until he didn’t see them on the plane to Africa: “I didn’t find out until they didn’t turn up, because nobody told me what was going on. I just got the vibe.”

Another challenge was when they arrived, the studio was only half finished. After setting up the equipment they could find, McCartney took over drum duties on the album, and shared the majority of instrumentation with Laine. Laine recalled that the two-man band approach came naturally to him and McCartney. Laine went on to say: “The album’s title song was a perfect example of how he and McCartney laid down the basic tracks for ‘Band On the Run.’ It was just me on acoustic guitar and Paul on drums. Maybe we added those extra guitars afterwards and just mixed the other stuff out.”

Linda McCartney was still learning as a musician, and during this time, became a valuable member of Wings and a key contributor to the sound Paul was trying to create.

Another incident was the night Paul and Linda were mugged by bandits at knifepoint. They took their cash, Linda’s camera, and the tapes with the Band On the Run demos. Paul had to go back and re-record based on memory.

Being in a place with strange and scary things happening, they had to adapt to their circumstances.

Shortly after Band On the Run was released in early December of 1973, McCartney said: “The basic idea about the band on the run is a kind of prison escape. At the beginning of the album the guy is stuck inside four walls, and eventually breaks out.”

The iconic cover was also a unique experience. Paul had mentioned that he wanted to try a different approach and include some of their friends in other professions to be the band on the run and include them in a spotlight photograph. The six non-Wings people in the photo are Kenny Lynch, Michael Parkinson, Clement Freud, James Coburn, John Conteh, and Christopher Lee.

This rare Grammy reads: “National Academy Of Recording Arts & Sciences / Paul McCartney & Wings / Best Pop Performance / By a Duo or Group with Vocal – 1974/ ‘Band On The Run.'”

Measures 4 ¾” squared and 6 ½” tall. In Very Good Plus condition with scratches and some adhesive residue on the back portion of the award. Has scratching, some light tarnishing, and the base pads are worn down.

There were only three made: one for Paul, one for Linda, and one for Denny Laine. This is Laine’s.

Band On The Run is Paul’s best-selling album since the breakup of the Beatles. “Jet” and “Helen Wheels” were both top ten hits and the title track hit number #1 on the Billboard singles chart. It went on to sell over 8 million copies.

This classic recording is etched in history as one of the best of all time.

This Grammy was originally sold by JoJo Laine, former wife of Denny Laine, in 2001. Then by Julien’s in 2003. It’s Only Rock N Roll sold it in 2007 to Charles and Sherry Heard. From 2009 until today, Charles and Sherry Heard. They loaned this Grammy to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Cleveland, Ohio where it has been displayed in the museum’s acclaimed Beatles’ exhibit. It has been seen and enjoyed by millions of fans worldwide. Now is the time for a new owner to enjoy seeing it on display.

Denny Laine, in his own hand, has also written the LOA confirming its authenticity and giving his permission to sell.

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PAUL MCCARTNEY BOOK LAUNCH EVENT COMING TO LIVERPOOL WATERSTONES

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Waterstones in Liverpool’s city centre is hosting an exclusive event for the launch of Paul McCartney’s book The Lyrics: 1956 to the Present.
The Liverpool-born legend shot to fame with The Beatles, making history and leaving a legacy on the music industry that still lasts to this day.

The Lyrics: 1956 to the Present by Paul McCartney is an intimate self-portrait from one of the greatest songwriters of all time, with the musician tracing his life from boyhood to the present day through the lyrics to 154 iconic songs, alongside captivating commentary and never-before-seen photographs, drafts and letters.

On November 1, Waterstones Liverpool will be hosting an evening of celebration for the launch of the book.
Customers are invited to join the bookshop team for an evening of music, visual splendour and Beatles themed fun, leading up to the midnight release of Paul McCartney’s The Lyrics.
The night will also include a performance from the band The Bootleg Beatles, a Beatles themed quiz and much more.

Tom Hawley, bookshop manager at Waterstones Liverpool, said: “We’re tremendously excited to be hosting this event in celebration of Paul McCartney’s hugely anticipated The Lyrics. Let the Beatlemania begin.”

Dressing up and costumes are welcome, and there will be a prize for the most inventive costume.

Further details of the evening’s entertainment will be announced nearer the time.

PAUL MCCARTNEY, BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN,JONAS BROTHERS RAISE $77.5 MILLION FOR CHARITY IN ONE NIGHT

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The annual fundraising event returned to the calendar this year after going on a COVID-19 pandemic-induced hiatus.

Paul made a special appearance at the event which was held by New York’s largest poverty-fighting organisation.
The singer was seen standing on stage in front of a glimmering silver award as he delivered a speech to guests who enjoyed dinner at the bash.

was seen standing on stage in front of a glimmering silver award as he delivered a speech to guests who enjoyed dinner at the bash.

He was also billed to perform, with separate performances from Alicia Keys, Bruce Springsteen and the Jonas Brothers.

This year’s function fell on the 20-year anniversary of the foundation’s Concert for New York City, which raised over $35million (£25.4million) for New Yorkers following the 9/11 attacks.

The money raised this year will be used to benefit nonprofits that help New York City as it bounces back from the pandemic.

PAUL MCCARTNEY SETS THE RECORD STRAIGHT ON BEATLES SPLIT

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Rock history has painted Paul McCartney as the man who broke up the band. Now he reveals that it was Lennon who was first to look for a way out
It remains the most analysed break-up in rock history: the one that set the template. When the Beatles split more than 50 years ago and Paul McCartney, John Lennon, George Harrison and Ringo Starr went their separate ways, it was McCartney who shouldered most of the blame.

“I didn’t instigate the split. That was our Johnny,” Paul said.

McCartney has insisted in a candid and detailed interview to be broadcast later this month.
Recalling what he sees as the “most difficult period of my life”, McCartney, who celebrates his 80th birthday next summer, reveals he wanted the group to go on, especially as after just eight years together, they were still creating “pretty good stuff”. “Abbey Road, Let It Be, not bad,” he will argue in an upcoming episode of the new BBC Radio 4 interview series This Cultural Life. “This was my band, this was my job, this was my life, so I wanted it to continue.”

If Lennon had not quit, the band’s musical journey might have been much longer, McCartney agrees. “It could have been. The point of it really was that John was making a new life with Yoko. John had always wanted to sort of break loose from society because, you know, he was brought up by his Aunt Mimi, who was quite repressive, so he was always looking to break loose.”

Legend has it that McCartney unilaterally broke up the band in 1970 when he answered a journalist’s question with the claim that the Beatles no longer existed. He was also accused of spoiling the group dynamic by asking in lawyers to settle their disputes. It is a burden he has struggled with ever since. “I had to live with that because that was what people saw. All I could do is say, no,” he admits, speaking out in advance of the publication of the book of lyrics that McCartney agrees is as close as he may ever come to an autobiography.

Paul McCartney with John Wilson, his interviewer for This Cultural Life on BBC Radio 4

If Lennon had not quit, the band’s musical journey might have been much longer, McCartney agrees. “It could have been. The point of it really was that John was making a new life with Yoko. John had always wanted to sort of break loose from society because, you know, he was brought up by his Aunt Mimi, who was quite repressive, so he was always looking to break loose.”

Legend has it that McCartney unilaterally broke up the band in 1970 when he answered a journalist’s question with the claim that the Beatles no longer existed. He was also accused of spoiling the group dynamic by asking in lawyers to settle their disputes. It is a burden he has struggled with ever since. “I had to live with that because that was what people saw. All I could do is say, no,” he admits, speaking out in advance of the publication of the book of lyrics that McCartney agrees is as close as he may ever come to an autobiography.

The interview also comes ahead of increased scrutiny that is set to follow the release next month of Get Back, Peter Jackson’s television series chronicling the final months of the band.

Asked about his decision to go solo, McCartney says: “Stop right there. I am not the person who instigated the split. Oh no, no, no. John walked into a room one day and said I am leaving the Beatles. Is that instigating the split, or not?”

McCartney tells interviewer John Wilson that Lennon described his decision to leave as “quite thrilling” and “rather like a divorce”. The other members, he adds, were “left to pick up the pieces”.

Paul ended up suing the rest of the band in the high court, seeking the dissolution of their contractual relationship in order to keep their music out of Klein’s hands.

Confusion about who caused the break-up arose because the group’s new manager, Allen Klein, told them to keep quiet about the split while he concluded some business deals. “So for a few months we had to pretend,” McCartney tells Wilson. “It was weird because we all knew it was the end of the Beatles but we couldn’t just walk away.” Eventually, McCartney became unhappy with the subterfuge and “let the cat out of the bag” because “I was fed up of hiding it”.

Remembering the unpleasant atmosphere at the time and the “dodgy” influence of Klein, McCartney said: “Around about that time we were having little meetings and it was horrible. It was the opposite of what we were. We were musicians not meeting people,” he said. The split became inevitable, he believes, because John “wanted to go in a bag and lie in bed for a week in Amsterdam for peace. And you couldn’t argue with that.” Yet he does not hold Yoko responsible, he adds. “

The lawyers, he claims, were brought in to protect the Beatles legacy: “I had to fight and the only way I could fight was in suing the other Beatles, because they were going with Klein. And they thanked me for it years later. But I didn’t instigate the split. That was our Johnny coming in one day and saying ‘I’m leaving the group’.”

Paul said he could not “foresee a time when Lennon-McCartney becomes an active songwriting partnership again”.

McCartney will also discuss the discovery of the unrecorded Lennon and McCartney lyric to a song titled Tell Me Who He Is, which he has not seen for 60 years.

“It was amazing to find this. It is my handwriting but I don’t know how it goes. It would have been a love ballad, rock thing. I would have probably had a tune to it. But you could not put things down. You didn’t have any recording devices so you had to remember them.”

Perhaps more surprisingly, the musician reveals that a long-lost radio play script, written with Lennon, has also just been unearthed. “For years I’ve been telling people that me and John wrote a play. It is quite a funny thing called Pilchard, and it is about the messiah, actually.”

The four pages of dialogue, he reveals, were inspired by the kitchen-sink genre, popular at the time, and the drama revolves around a mother and daughter and their mysterious lodger upstairs.

The interview goes out on 23 October and, the following Monday, recordings of McCartney reading from his new book, “The Lyrics”.