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Tag Archives BOOKS

NEW BOOK: SOLID STATE: THE STORY OF ABBEY ROAD AND THE END OF THE BEATLES

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“Solid State: The Story of Abbey Road and the End of the Beatles” by Kenneth Womack (whose previous books include a two-part series on the life and work of Beatles producer George Martin) is due October, 15. Hardcover, with 296 pages, with a foreword by Alan Parsons, is timed to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the Beatles’ Abbey Road album. The book will be published by Cornell University Press and is available now for pre-order in the U.S. here and the U.K. here.

Womack’s colorful retelling of how this landmark album was written and recorded is a treat for fans of the Beatles. Introduced with a foreword by renowned engineer, producer, and musician Alan Parsons, Solid State takes readers back to 1969 and into EMI’s Abbey Road Studios, which featured an advanced solid-state transistor mixing desk. Womack focuses on the dynamics between John, Paul, George, Ringo and producer George Martin and his team of engineers, who set aside the tensions and conflicts that had arisen on previous albums to create a work that boasted an innovative studio-bound sound that prominently included the new Moog synthesizer, among other novelties.
Abbey Road was the culmination of the instrumental skills, recording equipment and artistic vision that the band and George Martin had developed since their early days in the very same studio seven years earlier. A testament to the group’s unparalleled creativity and their producer’s ingenuity, Solid State is required reading for all fans of the Beatles and the history of rock ’n’ roll.

Last Day to Enter! #WIN IN BEATLES MAGAZINE!..THE NEW BOOK “THE WHITE ALBUM,THE ALBUM,#THEBEATLES AND THE WORLD IN 1968” By BRIAN SOUTHALL

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Last Day to Enter! #WIN IN BEATLES MAGAZINE!..THE NEW BOOK “THE WHITE ALBUM,THE ALBUM,#THEBEATLES AND THE WORLD IN 1968″ By BRIAN SOUTHALL, Carlton Books ltd, Enter for a chance to WIN 1 of the 2 BOOKS SIGNED by the author. COMPETITION:Sat 13 October-Sat 20
RESULTS: Sunday 21 October,2018.
RULES: You must be BEATLES MAGAZINE Member here, on Facebook, Twitter or Google+ .Share the Pic on your Profile (Public) and Send us a Private Message with your country.

Packed full of musical and historical analysis centred on the Beatles at the peak of their popularity, The White Album: A-side/B-side takes a look at one of the greatest albums ever created, and the tumultuous time period it was born into.The ultimate guide to the eclectic styles, techniques and stories behind the universally renowned “The White Album”.Including an indepth guide to the album and an exploration of the political and social influences,this captures revolutiony moment in musical history.
Brian Southall worked as a journalist with Music Business Weekly, Melody Maker and Disc before joining A&M Records. He moved to EMI Records and EMI Music, where, during a 15 year career, he served in press, promotion, marketing, artist development and corporate communications. From 1989 he was a consultant to Warner Music International, HMV Group and both the British Phonographic Industry (BPI) and the International Federation of the phonographic Industry (IFPI). Among other books, he has written are the official history of Abbey Road Studios and the Story of Northern Songs, both published by Omnibus Press.

DREAMING THE BEATLES: THE LOVE STORY OF ONE BAND AND THE WHOLE WORLD

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Rob Sheffield’s book Dreaming the Beatles: The Love Story of One Band and the Whole World is a celebration of the band, from the longtime Rolling Stone columnist. It tells the weird saga of how four lads from Liverpool became the world’s biggest pop group, then broke up – yet somehow just kept getting bigger. Dreaming the Beatles, out in paperback on June 19th, follows the ballad of John, Paul, George and Ringo, from their Sixties peaks to their afterlife as a cultural obsession. In this section, Sheffield explores one of the Beatles’ unheard treasures – the May 1968 Esher demos they recorded at George Harrison’s pad, preparing for the White Album, not suspecting their friendship was about to turn upside down.

The end of May, 1968: the Beatles meet up at Kinfauns, George Harrison’s bungalow in Esher. Just back from India, gearing up to go hit Abbey Road and start their next album, the lads bang out some rough acoustic tunes into George’s newfangled Ampex reel-to-reel tape deck. The result is one of their weirdest and loveliest unreleased recordings: the Esher demos. There’s nothing else in their music quite like this. Most of the 27 songs ended up on the White Album, yet there’s none of that record’s tension and dread.

In an excerpt from his new book ‘Dreaming the Beatles,‘ the author looks back at the ups and downs of the former Fab Four adrift in the Seventies.

Fifty years later, the Esher demos remain one of the Beatles’ strangest artifacts. When the boys gathered at George’s pad in the last days of May – nobody’s sure of the exact date – they had excellent reason to feel cocky about their new material. They wrote these songs on retreat with the Maharishi in Rishikesh, India, a place where they had no electric instruments. As John Lennon said years later, “We sat in the mountains eating lousy vegetarian food and writing all these songs. We wrote tons of songs in India.” John, the most distractible Beatle, had the hot streak of his life during his three months in Rishikesh, which is why the White Album is their most John-intensive record.
When the Beatles regrouped in England, they decided to get together and tape home demos on their own turf before stepping into Abbey Road – an innovation they’d never tried before and would never revisit. So they met at George’s hippie bungalow in the Surrey countryside, decorated in the grooviest Indian style. John showed up with 15 tunes, more than Paul (7) or George (5)….

source:rollingstone

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BEATLES BOOKS GUIDE

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The best books about the Beatles rank among the best pop culture writing—and criticism—ever. The following volumes provide the foundation of any Beatles library. These titles offer richly reported history, incisive critical analysis, detailed accounts of the quartet at work, and insider accounts that humanize a band who are still often seen as larger-than-life caricatures. Reading any one of these books will provide insight into a phenomenon that’s often thought of only in the broadest terms.

 

The Complete Beatles Recording Sessions: The Official Story of the Abbey Road Years by Mark Lewisohn

Granted unprecedented access to Abbey Road’s vaults and tape logs, Mark Lewisohn wrote The Complete Beatles Recording Sessions as a sequel to The Beatles Live!, a chronicle of all the concerts the Fabs played. That 1986 book splits the difference between fan service and scholarship, but The Complete Beatles Recording Sessions transcends such distinctions by providing a riveting day-by-day account of how the Beatles created their art. Alternate takes are examined in detail, along with overdubs and unreleased songs, many of which wouldn’t make it out of the Abbey Road vaults until the ’90s release of the multi-part Anthology, if ever. Lewisohn’s skills as a documentarian give this book an enthralling narrative: The songs take shape in print as he precisely details them.

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As Time Goes By by Derek Taylor

Derek Taylor was one of the great non-musical figures of ’60s rock’n’roll. He served as the Beatles press agent twice, once during Beatlemania and once after the 1967 death of the band’s manager, Brian Epstein—before returning to helm the press office of Apple Corps, the doomed multimedia conglomerate the band established in 1968. He also spent the middle of the Swinging Sixties in California, where he worked with the Byrds, organized the Monterey Pop Festival, and was unsuccessfully wooed by Hollywood icon Mae West. Taylor attracted these luminaries because he was there during the heat of Beatlemania, but the wondrous thing about his memoir, As Time Goes By, is how he’s as much an observer as he is a participant in the chaos. Already in his 30s when he discovered the Beatles, Taylor’s life was transformed by the Fabs. The book was written in 1973, when the group were all alive and all thorns in his side, but he was keen to capture just how wondrous their moment in time was.

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Dreaming the Beatles: The Love Story of One Band and the Whole World by Rob Sheffield (2017)

Nearly every book about the Beatles is a historical document of some sort, attempting to capture the group within the confines of the ’60s. Rob Sheffield turns this concept on its head with Dreaming the Beatles, choosing instead to interpret what they meant as an evolving cultural institution in the decades following their breakup.
This isn’t to say Sheffield dismisses history. As a music critic who grew up with the Beatles as a constant in his life, he’s absorbed countless books and articles about the band, which frees him to draw fresh, surprising insights about their music, including the stacks of records the Fab Four released as solo artists.
Dreaming the Beatles is the only book to acknowledge the interconnectivity (the music he made as a Beatle/solo) and it’s also filled with sharp criticism that challenges conventional wisdom. Once you know the history by heart, this is the place to understand what the Beatles mean now.

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Tune In: The Beatles: All These Years, Volume 1 by Mark Lewisohn

Tune In—the first (and, to date, only) installment in a planned three-part biography from eminent Beatles scholar Mark Lewisohn, he intentionally recreates the rise of the Beatles at a pace so unhurried, it gives the illusion that events are unfolding in real time. Perhaps such deliberateness is the inexorable result of a lifetime spent researching the Beatles, but the remarkable achievement of Tune In is how it makes the group’s first act, which runs from before the band’s formation until the end of 1962, seem like their most exciting era.

All of this is due to to Lewisohn’s decision to start his research from scratch. In doing so, he finds that printing the legend has obscured the truth: Such worn stories like Decca Records refusing to sign the Beatles, how George Martin received his assignment to produce the group, and John choosing which parent to live with simply didn’t happen the way scores of books say they did. These revelations, combined with Lewisohn’s knack at illustrating how the Beatles’ rise was not inevitable—time and time again, they hit limits on their respective circuits, and Lennon and McCartney went years without writing originals—gives Tune In a corrective punch. If Lewisohn never completes the other two volumes, at least he set the record straight for what is perhaps the murkiest period of the Beatles.

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source:pitchfork