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Tag Archives THE BEATLES

THE CLASSIC BEATLES SONG JOHN LENNON WROTE AFTER HE “STOPPED TRYING TO THINK”

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“John said ‘Nowhere Man’ came only after he’d given up on writing. The song arrived on Rubber Soul, the 1965 record George Harrison called the band’s “first fully fledged pothead album.” On this track, John sang about a character who’s “as blind as can be” and doesn’t even manage to have a point of view.

When John spoke about composing “Nowhere Man,” he stressed how different the songwriting experience was for him.
By the time The Beatles tackled “Nowhere Man” in October ’65, they had completed several key tracks for Rubber Soul. “Drive My Car,” the opener by Paul McCartney, and “If I Needed Someone,” George to the California sound, were already on tape.

The same goes for “In My Life” and “Norwegian Wood,” two John had brought to the studio earlier in the Rubber Soul sessions. But John would still come out with “Nowhere Man,” a song that came to him after a long night of frustrating attempts at writing.

In his ’60s Beatles biography, Hunter Davies quoted John explaining how his frustrations ceased. “I’d actually stopped trying to think of something,” John said. “Nothing would come. I […] went for a lie down, having given up. Then I thought of myself as Nowhere Man, sitting in this Nowhere Land.”

Looking back on writing “Nowhere Man” in 1980, John continued the story. “[It] came, words and music, the whole damn thing, as I lay down,” he told David Sheff in All We Are Saying. “So letting it go is what the whole game is.”
‘Nowhere Man’ became 1 of the last new songs The Beatles performed live.

When The Beatles embarked on their final tour, they had just finished Revolver (1966), an album with several songs they wouldn’t consider playing live.
The final Beatles live sets only featured songs up to Rubber Soul. But the Fab Four also passed on most of that album on their ’66 tour.
However, “Nowhere Man” was one of two Rubber Soul tracks to make the cut. (George’s “If I Needed Someone” was the other.)


THE BEATLES SONG GEORGE HARRISON WROTE JUST TO “PASS THE TIME”

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George Harrison had contributed a few songs to the Fab Four but one track which appeared on the Magical Mystery Tour EP and album was made when George was just sitting back and waiting for the time to pass by.

Blue Jay Way’ is a rare early song from George to be feature don the band’s album and was written primarily as George waited for publicist Derek Taylor to arrive at the house, a house situated on, yep, you guessed it, Blue Jay Way. “Derek Taylor got held up,” Harrison remembered, speaking with Hunter Davies in 1968. “He rang to say he’d be late. I told him on the phone that the house was in Blue Jay Way. And he said he could find it okay… he could always ask a cop.

“So I waited and waited. I felt really knackered with the flight, but I didn’t want to go to sleep until he came. There was a fog and it got later and later. To keep myself awake, just as a joke to pass the time while I waited, I wrote a song about waiting for him in Blue Jay Way. There was a little Hammond organ in the corner of this house which I hadn’t noticed until then… so I messed around on it and the song came.”

The track was one of several songs that George composed on the keyboard between 1966-1968 and saw the guitarist begin to finally find his feet within songwriting, having played third fiddle for so long. It also saw George begin to imbue his work with the delicacy of Indian classical music.


THE BEATLES FINALLY LET IT BE BY BRUCE SPIZER

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The Beatles “Get Back”/”Let It Be” sessions and the resulting unreleased and released albums and bootlegged recordings are among the most interesting and confusing aspects of the Beatles recorded legacy.
Bruce Spizer’s fourth installment in his Beatles album series, The Beatles Finally Let It Be covers the January 1969 rehearsals and recording sessions, the unreleased “Get Back” albums, “Let It Be” and “Let It Be…Naked,” along with American, British and Canadian perspectives. The book relies on articles from 1969 and 1970 magazines and newspapers to report on what fans knew about the sessions and the planned albums that were never issued, as well as reviews of the unreleased and released albums. There are also chapters on 1970 current events and music and film, plus a detailed breakdown of all of the songs released from the sessions. The fan recollections chapter includes stories from those were fortunate enough to be up on the roof for the Beatles final public performance on January 30, 1969, along with one from a fan on the ground.
This book measures 9″ x 9″ and includes images in both color and original black & white.
The Beatles Finally Let It Be is the perfect companion to the other books in the album series, the upcoming Get Back film directed by Peter Jackson, and the anniversary edition of the Let It Be album.

The book is an historical overview of the Get Back /Let It Be project commencing with its conception in September 1968 and running through the Let It Be…Naked album issued in November 2003. Any information pertaining to the new Get Back film and any possible set of new audio releases would only comprise of a relatively small part of the book. That said, the Beatles album series books are intended to be as complete as possible and cover all releases through the date the book goes on sale.

498 PRODUCTIONS, LLC proudly announces the upcoming publication of The Beatles Finally Let It Be, Bruce Spizer’s latest book in his Beatles album series which is set for release later this year.

The book will cover the Get Back/Let It Be sessions, the unreleased Get Back albums, the Let It Be album and film, the noteworthy Get Back bootlegs, the Anthology tracks from the sessions and Let It Be…Naked.

Like the other books in the series, The Beatles Finally Let It Be covers the  album and related releases from the American, British and Canadian perspectives.

The book contains chapters on newsworthy events of 1970 and the music and films from the first half of 1970.

There are also chapters on the Hey Jude and In The Beginning albums released in 1970.

And, of course, dozens of fan recollections about the album and film.

The Beatles “Get Back”/”Let It Be” sessions and the resulting unreleased and released albums and bootlegged recordings are among the most interesting and confusing aspects of the Beatles recorded legacy.

Description:

1st Edition, 2020
September 4, 2020
200 Pages
9″ x 9″
Hardbound
Full Color throughout

ORDER YOUR COPY HERE:

USA : HERE.

UK:    HERE.

FRANCE: HERE.

GERMANY: HERE.

SPAIN:  HERE.


GEORGE HARRISON WROTE “PIGGIES” AS A COMMENT ON GREED

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In the White Album era: “Blackbird,” Paul McCartney sang (if obscurely) in support of Civil Rights-era protesters. And John Lennon at least broached serious subjects on “Revolution 1.” In his own way, George Harrison did the same on “Piggies,” a song he began writing around the same time as “Taxman” (circa 1965-66). After getting little material on Sgt. Pepper’s and Magical Mystery Tour, George came back with four songs on the ’68 White Album.

With “Piggies,” George tried to tackle issues of capitalist greed (often framed as “income inequality” today). And despite the title and subsequent interpretation by Charles Manson it had nothing to do with the police or deranged cult concerns.
Since “Piggies” only contains three short verses and a vocal bridge, we don’t have a ton of material to sift through. But George’s simple, allegorical message is clear. With a nod to George Orwell’s 1984 (published 1945), George sings about a world in which some piggies are living it up while “life is getting worse” for others.

The big piggies have starched white shirts, eat dinner with their wives, and enjoy “backing.” In a verse George cut before recording “Piggies,” he even mentioned “piggy banks.” So it’s clear he was calling out the inequality between classes as he saw it in the mid-’60s.

In 1980, George spoke about its composition without going too in-depth. “‘Piggies’ is a social comment,” he said. He pointed to the phrase “damn good whacking” as referring to a spanking (“a hiding,” in George’s words).

About a decade earlier, Manson had interpreted the lyrics as the establishment (“piggies”) needing a shock (in the form of an assault, or “whacking”) with very specific weapons (in this case, the “forks and knives” Manson’s followers used in a murder).

George said ‘Piggies’ made no reference to police or other groups
Since The White Album hit record stores in November ’68, you can see why people might have thought a song titled “Piggies” would be a reference to the police. Law enforcement had assaulted countless protesters during the ’68 Democratic National Convention in Chicago that summer.

When the Walker Report was published, it described those events in Chicago as “a police riot.” And the police heard protesters calling them “pigs” at every turn. So you understand how some young people would imagine the biggest band of the ’60s was using the word in this way.

But that wasn’t the case. “It had absolutely nothing to do with American policemen or Californian shagnasties!” George said in 1980. While British bands touring the U.S. were often horrified by the levels of police violence, this White Album track wasn’t a response to any of that.

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